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  • BERLIN/ PARIS, Sept 16- Airbus Group has unveiled plans to sell half a dozen businesses with combined annual revenues of around 2 billion euros, simplifying its Defence and Space division to focus on warplanes, missiles, launchers and satellites.

  • *ECB openly addresses economic benefits of weaker euro. FRANKFURT/ TOKYO/ WASHINGTON, Sept 16- Attempts by the European Central Bank to weaken the euro have the potential to spark a currency war but policymakers across the world are keeping silent, knowing the ECB has scant alternatives to keep its economy afloat.

  • BERLIN/ PARIS, Sept 16- Airbus Group has unveiled plans to sell half a dozen businesses with combined annual revenues of around 2 billion euros, simplifying its Defense and Space division to focus on warplanes, missiles, launchers and satellites.

  • Sept 15- Airbus Group announced plans on Tuesday to sell half a dozen businesses following a portfolio review in Defence& Space. Space Shuttle programme and was last month named supplier of the year in its category by Airbus's rival Boeing.

  • Sept 15- Airbus Group announced plans on Tuesday to sell half a dozen businesses following a portfolio review in Defense& Space. Space Shuttle program and was last month named supplier of the year in its category by Airbus's rival Boeing.

  • BERLIN/ PARIS, Sept 16- Airbus Group unveiled plans on Tuesday to sell half a dozen business units with combined revenues of around two billion euros as it focuses its Defence and Space division on warplanes, missiles, launchers and satellites.

  • Business Highlights Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 5:46 PM ET

    'Minecraft' could boost Microsoft's mobile reach. NEW YORK— Microsoft's decision to spend $2.5 billion for the creator of the hit game "Minecraft" could help the Xbox maker grab attention on mobile phones, a new priority for the company. In addition, the founders of Mojang, the Swedish company behind "Minecraft," aren't staying with Microsoft.

  • European markets close: Oil declines     Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 11:30 AM ET

    CNBC's Simon Hobbs reports on all the market moving events in Europe today, including a down day for oil stocks and Air France has cancelled over half its flights because of a pilot strike.

  • Eurozone economic growth forecast cut Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 6:37 AM ET

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a think tank dealing with the world's developed countries, cut its forecasts for the eurozone this year to 0.8 percent from 1.2 percent in its May assessment. Italy, one of the more troubled economies in Europe, was downgraded from 0.5 percent to minus 0.4 percent.

  • Air France strike amid Europe's low-cost shakeup Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 6:14 AM ET

    Air France-KLM, which is the national carrier for France and the Netherlands, said it can ensure just 48 percent of flights Monday, 40 percent on Tuesday and perhaps less later in the week as unions protest against its savings program. Like Lufthansa, Alitalia, SAS and other national airlines in Europe, Air France-KLM is focusing on cost cuts to remain competitive.

  • *SABMiller, Heineken advance on M&A news. Weekend data showed China's factory output grew at the weakest pace in nearly six years in August while growth in other major sectors also fell, increasing fears that China may be at risk of a sharp slowdown unless Beijing takes new stimulus measures.

  • Union: Lufthansa pilots call off strike Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 3:07 AM ET

    BERLIN— Lufthansa plans to proceed with its long-haul flights from Frankfurt on Tuesday despite a pilots' strike, the airline said Monday. Germany's biggest airline said all 40 long-haul flights from Germany's busiest airport will go ahead, suggesting it expects to have enough staff to run them.

  • A Scottish 'Yes' also means exit from EU, NATO Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 2:31 AM ET

    BRUSSELS— If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security— the European Union and the U.S.-led NATO defense alliance.

  • Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann says he is "skeptical" about the European Central Bank's purchases of asset-backed securities as it transfers risks to the taxpayers.

  • Air France pilot strike amid low-cost tensions Monday, 15 Sep 2014 | 2:16 AM ET

    Air France is urging passengers to change or postpone travel, estimating that it can only ensure 48 percent of flights Monday. Air France-KLM announced an investment plan last week aimed at saving 1 billion euros over the next several years, and said it will transfer much of its European operations— and jobs— to low-cost carrier Transavia.

  • The French, German and Italian finance ministers discuss the need for investment in the euro zone.

  • PREVIEW-Hardest yet to come for France's Hollande Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 | 7:05 AM ET

    PARIS, Sept 14- A bitter public attack by a jilted ex-partner, a cabinet melt-down and the admission of broken economic promises have meant an uncomfortable three weeks for Francois Hollande.

  • Samsung accuses LG execs of damaging its products Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 | 6:37 AM ET

    SEOUL, South Korea— Samsung Electronics Co. has accused senior executives of domestic rival LG Electronics Inc. of intentionally vandalizing its washing machines at retail stores in Germany and has asked for an official investigation.

  • Anti-euro party strong in German state votes Sunday, 14 Sep 2014 | 4:55 AM ET

    BERLIN— A new party that has expanded its anti-euro stance into a broader appeal to protest voters won seats in two more German state legislatures Sunday, building on recent momentum and intensifying a headache for established parties.

  • France bristles as Netflix advances in Europe Saturday, 13 Sep 2014 | 2:24 AM ET

    PARIS— Netflix is tapping into six new markets Monday hoping to gain a big subscriber base around Europe, but is facing a frosty welcome in France. Well-established French competitors are trying to head off a Netflix wave, the government wants oversight and the cinema industry wants Netflix to invest heavily in French productions.