Money

11 books that will teach you to get rich, summed up in a sentence

Personal finance as a genre can seem overwhelming: There are so many great books on the subject to choose from. And while it would be convenient to be able to consume 50 books a year, we can't all be like Bill Gates. Most of us have to pick and choose where to start.

If you're short on time, begin by checking out CNBC's one-sentence summary of 11 top-notch money-related reads. We've also included a representative quote from each to give you a sense of the writing.

1. "Think and Grow Rich" by Napoleon Hill

Originally published: 1937

Mastering your money has more to do with mindset and overcoming psychological barriers than anything else — at the end of the day, you can think your way to success.

"Riches begin in the form of thought! The amount is limited only by the person in whose mind the thought is put into motion."

2. "The Intelligent Investor" by Benjamin Graham

Originally published: 1949

"Value investing" — buying stocks when they are undervalued and holding them for a long period of time — is the most effective way to put your money to work ... and a hallmark of Warren Buffett's investment strategy.

"But investing isn't about beating others at their game. It's about controlling yourself at your own game."

3. "Your Money or Your Life" by Vicki Robin, Joe Dominguez, and Monique Tilford

Originally published: 1992

You exchange your time for money, so start thinking about how many hours of your life it took to save up the money to buy something and ask yourself questions like, How much of my life did I trade for this? and, Is it worth it?

"Money is something we choose to trade our life energy for."

4. "How Rich People Think" by Steve Siebold

Originally published: 2013

Anyone can become a millionaire — the secret isn't in the mechanics of money, but in the level of thinking that generates it.

"I interviewed rich people because I wanted to be rich. What I discovered was, to get rich, I had to learn to think like a rich person. ... Once I changed my thinking, the money started to flow."

5. "The Richest Man in Babylon" by George S. Clason

Originally published: 1926

You probably won't get rich quick, but you'll get rich if you pay yourself first, put that money to work and stick to long-term thinking.

"I found the road to wealth when I decided that a part of all I earned was mine to keep. And so will you."

6. "The Automatic Millionaire" by David Bach

Originally published: 2003

You don't need a budget, you don't need to make a lot of money, and you don't even need willpower to accumulate a fortune — all you need to do is put your finances on autopilot.

"The one way to create lasting financial change that will help you build real wealth over time is to make your financial plan automatic!"

7. "Rich Dad Poor Dad" by Robert Kiyosaki

Originally published: 1997

Knowing the difference between an asset — something that puts money in your pocket — and a liability — something that takes money out of your pocket — is the single most important distinction to recognize if you want to get rich.

"The long-term rich build their asset column first. Then the income generated from the asset column buys their luxuries. The poor and middle class buy luxuries with their own sweat, blood, and children's inheritance."

8. "The Little Book of Common Sense Investing" by John C. Bogle

Originally published: 2007

The simplest and most efficient investment strategy is to invest in low-cost index funds.

"Investing is all about common sense. Owning a diversified portfolio of stocks and holding it for the long term is a winner's game."

9. "Rich Habits" by Thomas Corley

Originally published: 2010

What you do every day matters so, if you want to build wealth, start by reevaluating your daily habits.

"The metaphor I like is the avalanche. These habits are like snowflakes — they build up, and then you have an avalanche of success."

10. "I Will Teach You to be Rich" by Ramit Sethi

Originally published: 2009

There aren't any secrets to getting rich — all it takes are small steps, a bit of discipline, and a willingness to simply get started on managing your money.

"Getting started is more important than becoming an expert. Too many of us get overwhelmed thinking we need to manage our money perfectly, which leads us to do nothing at all. That's why the easiest way to manage your money is to take it one step at a time — and not worry about being perfect."

11. "Unshakeable" by Tony Robbins

Originally published: 2017

You don't have to predict the future to win the investment game — if you focus on what you can control, you can be the master of your investment fate.

"Control what you can control. ... You need to learn the rules of the financial game, who the players are, what their agendas are, where you can get hurt, and how you can win."

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