Careers

4 epic stories of people quitting their jobs in public

Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ).
Matt McClain | The Washington Post | Getty Images
Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ).

At one point or another, everyone has felt like quitting their job — but not everyone does it.

Tuesday, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz, proved he was seriously quitting. In a speech on the Senate floor, Flake announced that he will not seek re-election and issued criticism of the Republican party and President Donald Trump.

If Flake's action has inspired thoughts of walking out of your office, here are four other epic stories of people quitting their jobs in public.

1. Using a marching band

In a now famous 2011 Youtube video with over 5 million views called "Joey Quits," then 23-year-old Joey DeFrancesco quit his job at the Renaissance Providence Downtown Hotel. But, he wasn't alone — he had the help of an entire marching band.

In the video, a manager sees the group and tells them to leave. Joey then replies, "I'm here to tell you that I'm quitting," and the band breaks into song, marching around the hotel.

Screengrab from "Joey Quits" on Youtube.

"I hated them, and they hated me," he tells the Huffington Post about the job. "It was this big drawn-out war we were having with management ... I knew I had to get one last shot at them."

2. Sending a company-wide email

One option to go out in style? Let the whole company know how you feel. After a 35-year career working for the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, Michael Stuban had enough and decided to send a message just before retiring. In 2016, he sent a sharply critical exit review not only to the human resources department, but to all 2,000 of the organization's employees, the Washington Post reports. He called out his co-workers on things like "phoneyness," employees having "no morale" and managers being "out of touch."

3. With a slide and a beer

In 2010, JetBlue flight attendant Steven Slater lost his cool. After a disagreement with a passenger on a plane at Kennedy International Airport, he took to the PA system and "unleashed a profanity-laden tirade" according to The New York Times. Then, he grabbed a beer from the beverage cart, pulled the emergency exit shoot's slide and high-tailed it off the plane.

Steven Slater, a Jetblue flight attendant, is buckled up by Port Authority Police after arrest for pulling the emergency exit and exiting an airplane.
New York Daily News Archive | Getty Images
Steven Slater, a Jetblue flight attendant, is buckled up by Port Authority Police after arrest for pulling the emergency exit and exiting an airplane.

He was later sentenced to a year of probation on a misdemeanor charge of attempted criminal mischief after completing a mental health treatment program. He was also ordered to repay JetBlue $10,000 for the slide, CNN reports.

4. Using expletives

While delivering a live news report for a local CBS affiliate station in Anchorage, Alaska, Charlo Greene decided she was done with that job. After revealing on air that she was the owner of a local cannabis organization, she came out in favor of legalizing marijuana during the broadcast, CBS reports.

"And as for this job," Greene says to the audience, "well, not that I have a choice but, f--- it, I quit."

Then she walked off set, leaving an awkward moment for the other anchor, who managed to say, "Alright we apologize for that," and "We'll... we'll be right back."

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