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Eleanor Roosevelt's former NYC townhouse is on the market for $20 million — look inside

The former New York City townhome of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.
Douglas Elliman

The New York City townhouse that former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt once lived in is on the market for just under $20 million. 

The five-story residence, built in 1898, is located on Manhattan's Upper East Side, one block from Central Park. It has six bedrooms, five full bathrooms and two half-baths.

Roosevelt lived there from 1959 until her death in 1962, according to Douglas Elliman listing agent Gabrielle Corrao.

Take a look inside. 

The five-story home (center) has a curved limestone facade.
Douglas Elliman

"The parlor floor, the dining room and Roosevelt's bedroom all remain the original layouts, with original touches like moldings," Corrao tells CNBC.

Entrance hall
Douglas Elliman

"Roosevelt wrote her syndicated newspaper column from her desk [on the parlor floor]," which looks out over East 74th Street, Corrao says.

Living room
Douglas Elliman
Dining room
Douglas Elliman
Master bedroom
Douglas Elliman

Roosevelt also entertained dignitaries like President John F. Kennedy in the home, Corrao tells CNBC.

Douglas Elliman

Believe it or not, the former first lady, who was widowed in 1945, had roommates.

"She shared the house with Edna Gurewitsch and Dr. David Gurewitsch," says Corrao. David was Roosevelt's friend and personal physician, as well as a co-owner of the home. "Roosevelt occupied the first two floors, and the couple had the upper floors."

Corrao says the current owners of the home (who bought it from the Gurewitsches) told her Roosevelt hosted simple breakfasts and dinners and the house, as well as wedding ceremonies in the back garden.

Douglas Elliman

The home is certified as a landmark building by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. A plaque outside the home says that Roosevelt, "a political activist known for her unwavering commitment to human rights issues, lived here from 1959 to 1962."

Douglas Elliman
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