Health and Wellness

What Gabrielle Union is eating during the pandemic: 'I just eat whatever brings me joy'

David Crotty

If the Covid-19 quarantine has made eating comfort foods and baked goods seem even more appealing than usual, you're not alone.

Even actress and fitness fanatic Gabrielle Union has noticed a change in her nutrition habits.

"To be fully transparent, I go in and out of you know being healthier on some days than others," Union told Katie Couric during an Instagram Live conversation Wednesday.

Union, 47, said that her general philosophy around food is to "try to eat to feel good."

"Before all of this eating healthy made me feel good, and now I just eat whatever brings me joy," she said.

Union's pandemic foods of choice include cinnamon rolls, ice cream from a pint and pie, she said.

"My need for crust has become kind of crazy," she said, adding that she prefers pie crusts made with real butter or lard.

Before the pandemic, Union's exercise routine involved working out three times a week for 50 minutes. Her routine included full-body strength-training moves, such as squats and lunges, and six minutes of cardio, she told Women's Health in January.

Now, Union hosts at-home "quarantine workouts" with her husband, retired NBA star Dwayne Wade, on the free app, FitOn.

In these uncertain times, Union said it's important "just trying to survive however you can."

"There's no blueprint for it," she said. "It's weird, it's scary, it's terrifying, it's maddening. And if eating, you know, cinnamon rolls and adding butter on top of the frosting makes you feel better… alright."

Indeed, turning to comfort foods is a very normal reaction to the current pandemic situation, Kris Sollid, a registered dietitian and senior director of nutrition communications at the International Food Information Council, previously told CNBC Make It.

"It's okay to have an indulgent item once in a while, as long as your other choices and meals are providing good nutrition over time," Sollid said. "Understand that this is a stressful time and so some people may need those indulgences more often than they normally do."

In fact, some people might find that they are craving very specific foods, which is one way that your brain responds to stress.

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