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  • ATHENS, July 5- Having squarely rejected the terms of new financial aid for their cash-strapped country, Greece wakes up to an uncertain future on Monday. Like other "No" voters, Efthimiadis said he did not believe warnings by European and some Greek officials over the past week that a "No" vote would set off a cascade of events that would usher Greece out of the euro.

  • Anti-austerity 'No' voters celebrate the results of the first exit polls in front of the Greek parliament in Syntagma Square in Athens, Greece July 5, 2015.

    Greeks will today vote in a referendum that could determine the country's future—we're live blogging all the latest developments.

  • WELLINGTON, July 6- The euro fell sharply on Monday in Asia-Pacific trading after Greeks looked to have overwhelmingly rejected austerity measures demanded in return for bailout money. "Europe either folds or Greece goes bankrupt; over to you Merkel." The next step was unclear with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras saying his government had a mandate to reach...

  • *JPMorgan says Grexit now more likely than not. Many economists, including those at U.S. banking giant JPMorgan, reckon the outcome of Sunday's referendum will probably hasten Greece's exit from the euro. "Although the situation is fluid, at this point Greek exit from the euro appears more likely than not," JPMorgan's Malcolm Barr told clients on Sunday evening,...

  • Secretary of State John Kerry (L) speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin before a bilateral meeting at the presidential residence of Bocharov Ruchey in Sochi, Russia May 12, 2015.

    Secretary of State John Kerry warned Iran that hard choices were needed to seal a nuclear accord, and that the U.S. was prepared to walk away.

  • A man puts up referendum campaign posters with the word "No" in Greek in Athens, Greece, July 1, 2015.

    Despite fears of a "Grexit," the Greek Prime Minister said the "no" result was not a mandate to clash with Europe.

  • People celebrate in front of the Greek parliament as early opinion polls predict a win for the Oxi, or No, campaign in the Greek austerity referendum. Crowds are begining to gather in the squares of Athens waiting for the official result on July 5, 2015 in Athens, Greece.

    A guide to the next big turning points (that can already be predicted) in the rapidly unfolding crisis in Greece.

  • BERLIN, July 5- German Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed in a phone call with French President Francois Hollande on Sunday night that a euro zone leaders' summit should be held on Tuesday after Greeks rejected bailout terms in a referendum, a German government spokesman said. The chancellor and president also agreed that the referendum result should be...

  • BERLIN, July 5- German Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel told the Tagesspiegel daily that it was hard to imagine talks on a new bailout programme with Greece after the country clearly rejected bailout terms in a referendum. "With the rejection of the rules of the euro zone... negotiations about a programme worth billions are barely conceivable," said Gabriel, leader...

  • BERLIN, July 5- Senior German conservative Michael Fuchs told Reuters on Sunday that Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras had caused a "disaster" after early referendum results showed the country has rejected euro zone bailout terms. There is no chance that a solution will be achieved within 48 hours, "said Fuchs, who has long had reservations about bailouts for...

  • Greece's rejection of a set of repayment terms offered by creditors is likely to be the biggest factor driving markets on Monday.

  • *Referendum set to decide Greece's future in euro. ATHENS, July 5- Greeks voted overwhelmingly "No" on Sunday in a historic bailout referendum, partial results showed, defying warnings from across Europe that rejecting new austerity terms for fresh financial aid would set their country on a path out of the euro. "The negotiations which will start must be concluded...

  • BERLIN, July 5- German Chancellor Angela Merkel will travel to Paris on Monday afternoon to discuss the result of the Greek referendum with French President Francois Hollande, a German government spokesman said on Sunday.

  • *Referendum set to decide Greece's future in euro. ATHENS, July 5- Opinion polls released after Greece's bailout referendum on Sunday showed the' No' vote ahead, suggesting voters had defied warnings from across Europe that rejection of the creditors' terms would set their country on a path out of the euro. Athens' partners have warned over the past week that a' No' vote...

  • *Once-biggest exporter to Iran overtaken by China, Korea. FRANKFURT/ BERLIN, July 5- Martin Herrenknecht, founder of a company in southern Germany that is a world leader in tunnel-boring equipment, has been carefully preparing for the day when Iran reopens for business. It has maintained an office there, anticipating a day when Iran reaches a nuclear deal with...

  • BRUSSELS— CORRECTS: European Council president says he's called a summit Tuesday to discuss Greece.

  • FRANKFURT, July 5- Berlin is wooing private investors including Macquarie and JP Morgan to take a stake in its much-delayed new international airport, German newspaper Bild wrote on Sunday. He said the company was in a "pre-notification phase" with the European Commission, in which it has to demonstrate the potential return on investment for any private...

  • ATHENS, July 5- Greeks voted on Sunday in a referendum that could determine their future in Europe's common currency, with banks shuttered, the treasury empty and a population desperate, angry and so deeply split that the outcome was too close to call. His European partners, however, say rejection would set Greece on a path out of the euro, with potentially...

  • Chancellor George Osborne said he had found all $19 billion of welfare cuts he needs as part of his plan to balance the current budget.

  • The plan, which still needs Greek parliamentary approval and a final accord with Switzerland, is to levy a flat 21 percent tax on such assets to make them legitimate, raising millions that the government in Athens desperately needs, the Sunday paper said, citing unidentified sources. The amount should become clear by 2018, when Switzerland is supposed to begin...