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These are the 13 best jobs to have in 2019, according to US News & World Report

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If you're considering a new job or a career change this year, you may want to take a look at U.S. News & World Report's ranking of the 100 best jobs for 2019.

The No. 1 job to have in 2019 is software developer, the only tech role to make it in the publication's top 10. The No. 2 role is statistician. The field with by far the best job outlook this year is healthcare, claiming the remaining ten out of the top 13 jobs.

That's primarily thanks to healthcare's low unemployment rates and high salaries. High demand for nurse practitioners, physician assistants and physical therapists is "good news for students and career changers, because it takes less school time and tuition money to prepare for those positions than it does to become a physician or surgeon," said U.S. News reporter Rebecca Koenig in statement.

Here are the top 13 best jobs in 2019, according to U.S. New & World Report:

1. Software developer

Median salary: $101,790
Unemployment rate: 1.9 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Average
Work-life balance: Above average

2. Statistician

Median salary: $84,060
Unemployment rate: 0.9 percent
Future job prospects: Very good
Stress level: Below average
Work-life balance: Above average

3. Physician Assistant

Median salary: $104,860
Unemployment rate: 0.8 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Above average

4. Dentist

Median salary: $151,440
Unemployment rate: 0.9 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Average
Work-life balance: Above average

5. Orthodontist (tie)

Median salary: $208,000
Unemployment rate: 0.9 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Below average
Work-life balance: Above average

5. Nurse Anesthetist (tie)

Median salary: $165,120
Unemployment rate: 0.4 percent
Future job prospects: Excellent
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Below average

7. Nurse practitioner

Median salary: $103,880
Unemployment rate: 1.1 percent
Future job prospects: Excellent
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Below average

8. Pediatrician

Median salary: $172,650
Unemployment rate: 0.5 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Average

9. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon (tie)

Median salary: $208,000
Unemployment rate: 0.5 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Below average

9. Obstetrician and Gynecologist (tie)

Median salary: $208,000
Unemployment rate: 0.5 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Below average

9. Physician (tie)

Median salary: $192,930
Unemployment rate: 0.5 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: High
Work-life balance: Average

9. Prosthodontist (tie)

Median salary: $185,150
Unemployment rate: 0.9 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Above average
Work-life balance: Below average

13. Occupational Therapist

Median salary: $83,200
Unemployment rate: 0.5 percent
Future job prospects: Good
Stress level: Average
Work-life balance: Average

The publication analyzed U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data to determine which 100 jobs are hiring the most. It then looked across industries and measured the overall quality of each role based on seven factors: 10-year growth volume, 10-year growth percentage, median salary, employment rate, future job prospects, stress level and work-life balance. Several of the jobs on the list earned tying scores.

U.S. News & World Report's 2019 best jobs list also coincides with other recent findings. One analysis named healthcare a "future-proof" industry, while others named jobs such as occupational therapist and developer some of the best in America.

Though most of the top jobs offer a sense of job security, with low unemployment rates and good future job prospects, very few promise low stress levels. Notably, statistician — the lowest paid occupation among the top 13 jobs — and orthodontist offer both below-average stress levels and above-average work-life balance.

Meanwhile, several of the highest paying roles, such as physician and obstetrician and gynecologist have above-average stress levels and below-average work-balance. With nearly 40 percent of employees in the U.S. report feeling burned out due to overloaded schedules and lack of career growth, it's important to note that today's job seekers aren't only seeking out bigger salaries.

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