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Inside the $63 million mansion that's the most expensive in DC area — beating out Jeff Bezos' $35 million pad

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Jeff Bezos' $23-million 27,000-square-foot home was the most expensive property in Washington D.C. when he bought it in 2016. (He's reportedly also coughing up $12 million for renovations.)

Now, a 48,000-square-foot residence located on the edge of McLean's Great Falls Park in the D.C. suburb of McLean, Virginia, just went on sale for $62.95 million, dwarfing Bezos's buy and making this mansion the most expensive property ever to hit the market in the Washington D.C. area, according to the Washington Post.

Living area at The Falls
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Previously owned by the late James Kimsey, co-founder of AOL, the 3.2-acre estate is dubbed "The Falls," since it is the only house on the Potomac River with direct views of the rapid falls.

View of the Potomac
Sean Shanahan

The main residence has six bedrooms, each with private bathrooms, including a master suite in its own wing with a steam, sauna and Jacuzzi, as well as a custom mahogany library and wet bar, private lounge with wine cellar and media room.

The library at The Falls
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The outdoor terrace includes an infinity pool with sweeping views of the river, as well as a full-size tennis court and gardens.

Infinity pool at The Falls
Sean Shanahan

The estate is also equipped with private security and gate house, staff quarters, and an underground parking garage accommodating 30 cars.

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The estate comes with a separate, Frank Lloyd Wright-designed, three-bedroom guesthouse. "The Marden House," shaped like a fish, was built in 1959 and, according to agent Russell Firestone III, it's stayed pretty true to the original structure over decades. "There are pieces of original furniture," Firestone tells CNBC Make It. "It's pretty pristine."

The Frank Lloyd Wright-designed guesthouse
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