Post-Military Careers

After Service, What Now?
Military veterans face a massive adjustment when returning to civilian life. It’s not only a matter of transitioning from an ordered and regimented existence to a civilian’s more autonomous life; about a quarter of all Gulf War –era II veterans (anyone who served after September 2001) are also returning with a service-connected disability. However, disabled vets are working almost as much as non-disabled veterans (an unemployment rate of 9.1 percent in July 2010 vs 8.7 percent, according to the
Photo: Getty Images

Military veterans face a massive adjustment when returning to civilian life. It’s not only a matter of transitioning from an ordered and regimented existence to a civilian’s more autonomous life: About a quarter of all Gulf War II-era veterans — anyone who served after September 2001 — are returning with a service-connected disability, as well.

Disabled vets are working almost as much as nondisabled veterans, however (an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent among disabled in August 2011 vs. 7.5 percent among nondisabled, according to the Current Population Survey*), with many of those jobs in the public sector and federal government. Overall, veterans have an unemployment rate of 8.3 percent, mirroring that of those who have not served in the military. In the 18-24 age bracket, ex-military unemployment is at a much higher percentage of 29.1 percent, much higher than the rate of 17.6 percent for non vets in the same age group.

Last year brought the debut of a series of 100-fairs aimed at veterans and military families, hosted by Service Nation: Mission Serve.** Some 1,700 jobhunters attended the largest hiring fair of the series.

What are these candidates bringing to the table? Post-military personnel come to the workforce armed with marketable skills. “The U.S. military is the largest user of technology worldwide, so veterans in general are technically savvy,” says Debbie Gregory, CEO of the job site MiltaryConnection.com. “They are disciplined and understand the chain of command, as well as being team players. As an employer, I am consistently impressed with the superior work ethic, which also extends to military spouses. Transitioning military also are generally in good physical condition, drug free, without criminal records, and many hold various current security clearances, making them highly viable for defense contractors. This is a highly diverse group of candidates, satisfying diversity and inclusion needs of employers.”

A Google search reveals many websites catering specifically to this category of jobseekers. We consulted with Debbie Gregory of MilitaryConnection.com, as well as representatives from the online military community Military.com, for a list of the industries where the most ex-military personnel find work.

Experts from both websites mentioned the following industries as major employers:

·        Defense

·        Technical, including computer programming, software & development, telecommunications, and IT specialists

·        Security, law enforcement, and public safety

·        Health care (physicians, nurses, allied health, as well as medical management, billing, coding, and support)

·        Franchises and business management

Most of the above industries are intuitive, but the following slides will highlight some of the other industries that employ many post-military workers.

Gregory points out that programs are in place to help get ex-military personnel into the workforce, regardless of their previous training, although not all vets are aware of their options. With the post-9/11 GI Bill, for example, “Not only is tuition directly paid to a college, university, and trade school, including online schools,” she explains, “the veteran receives tax-free living expenses when taking 12 weekly hours, based on an E-5 rank with dependents, and the zip code of the school they attend. In my zip code, it is about $2,000 a month. They also receive $1,000 a year toward books.”

There’s financial motivation for employers to hire veterans, as well. Tax credits come off the employer’s FICA contributions.

According to Gregory, however, leaving no soldier behind is also simply the right thing to do: “Only 1 percent serve, so the rest of us need to make sure they can achieve the American dream, and that starts with having a good job.”

*  Employment percentages provided by Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor
** NOTE: CNBC’s parent company NBCUniversal is a sponsor of Mission Serve

By Colleen KaneOriginally posted July 2011
Updated 20 March 2012

Trade Jobs
As Debbie Gregory of Militaryconnection.com points out, the Post 9/11 GI Bill doesn’t have to be limited to university use. Veterans can take advantage of it to learn trades such as plumbing. Search results on Military.com bring up 389 painter jobs across the country, 163 plumber jobs, 519 welder jobs and the site’s maximum 1000 listings for HVAC jobs.
Photo: Marc Romanelli | Stone | Getty Images

As Gregory of MilitaryConnection.com points out, the post-9/11 GI Bill doesn’t have to be limited to university use. Veterans can take advantage of it to learn trades, such as plumbing and welding. Search results on Military.com bring up 389 painter jobs across the country, 163 plumber jobs, 519 welder jobs, and the site’s maximum 1,000 listings for HVAC jobs.

Customer Service and Technical Support
Customer service and technical support jobs are a huge category for veterans according to MilitaryConnection.com. A search on Military.com’s jobs database for “technical support” called up 509 related job openings listed in the past day.
Photo: ColorBlind Images | Iconica | Getty Images

Customer service and technical support jobs are a huge category for veterans, according to MilitaryConnection.com. A search on Military.com’s jobs database for “technical support” found 509 related job openings listed in just the past day.

Financial and Accounting
For those adept at accounting and finance, their facility with numbers was likely put to good use in the military, and it’s in high demand in the private sector as well, according to Militaryconnection.com. The job board on Military.com brings up the maximum 1000 job openings for “accounting” and 273 for “accountant” were listed within the past 24 hours.
Photo: Steve Cole | the Agency Collection | Getty Images

For those adept at accounting and finance, their knowledge was likely put to good use in the military and it’s in high demand in the private sector, as well, according to Militaryconnection.com. The job board on Military.com found the maximum 1,000 job openings for “accounting” and 273 for “accountant,” just within the past 24 hours.

Education
Education is a popular option for ex-military job seekers, say the experts at Military.com. An open-location job search for “teacher” on Military.com yields the maximum 1000 results across the country, with 106 job openings for teachers listed in the past day.
Photo: Radius Images | Getty Images

Education is a popular option for ex-military jobseekers, say the experts at Military.com. An open-location job search for “teacher” on Military.com yields the maximum 1,000 results across the country, with 106 job openings for teachers listed in the past day.

Construction
As Gregory mentioned, those transitioning from the military are likely to be in good physical condition. For those who wish to maintain their fitness, Military.com points out that construction is a major post-military employer. An open-location search for  “construction” jobs on the site brings up the maximum 1000 results, and 696 of those openings were posted in the past 24 hours.
Photo: Getty Images

As Gregory mentioned, those transitioning from the military are likely to be in good physical condition. For those who wish to maintain their fitness, Military.com points out that construction is a major post-military employer. An open-location search for  “construction” jobs on the site found the maximum 1,000 results, and 696 of those openings were posted in the past 24 hours.

Transportation
The transportation industry is a huge employer of ex-military personnel, says MilitaryConnection.com. A search for “transportation” on Military.com brings up the 1,000-job listing maximum, with 813 of those openings listed in the past day, and “driver” are even more dramatic, with all 1000 jobs listed in the past 24 hours.
Photo: Monty Rakusen | Photodisc | Getty Images

The transportation industry is a huge employer of ex-military personnel, says MilitaryConnection.com. A search for “transportation” on Military.com brings up the 1,000-job listing maximum, with 813 of those openings listed in the past day. Results for “driver” are even more dramatic, with all 1,000 jobs listed in the past 24 hours.

Energy
The energy industry employs a significant number of ex-military personnel, says MilitaryConnection.com. Job listings on Military.com indicate it’s one of the most saturated markets, with the maximum result of 1000 job openings, all posted in the past 24 hours.
Photo: Tim Matsui | Aurora | Getty Images

The energy industry employs a significant number of ex-military personnel, says MilitaryConnection.com. Job listings on Military.com indicate it’s one of the most saturated markets, with the maximum result of 1,000 job openings, all posted in the past 24 hours.

Insurance
The insurance industry, which was called out by Military Connection as a major employer of veterans, is another one of the most saturated job markets. According to results on Military.com, a job search for “insurance” yeilds the maximum result of 1000 job openings, all posted in the past 24 hours.
Photo: Chris Ryan | OJO Images | Getty Images

The insurance industry, which was called out by Military Connection as a major employer of veterans, is another one of the most saturated job markets. According to results on Military.com, a job search for “insurance” yields the maximum result of 1,000 job openings, all posted in the past 24 hours.

Retail
One last industry with an enormous supply of open jobs that welcomes veterans is retail, says MilitaryConnection.com. This is another one of the most saturated markets, according to results on Military.com, with the maximum result of 1000 job openings, all posted in the past 24 hours.
Photo: Chris Whitehead | Photographer's Choice RF | Getty Images

One last industry with an enormous supply of open jobs that welcomes veterans is retail, says MilitaryConnection.com. This is another one of the most saturated markets, according to results on Military.com, with the maximum result of 1,000 job openings, all posted in the past 24 hours.

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