Funds slammed by Russia's stocks and ruble struggles

VIDEO3:0703:07
Russia's ruble ripple

The rapid fall of the ruble and stocks on the Moscow Exchange means even more pain for investment managers who have been trying to play Russia, virtually all unsuccessfully.

Mutual funds, designed to bet on price gains in securities, have predictably suffered the most. The Voya Russia Fund, for example, is off more than 43 percent in 2014 as of Monday on bad bets such as energy company Lukoil (down 25 percent), retailer Magnit (down 52 percent), and miner Norilsk Nickel (down 27 percent), according to public holdings as of Sept. 30. The fund has the highest mutual fund exposure to Russia at 76.7 percent, according to data compiled by Morningstar. 

Another to suffer is the T. Rowe Price Emerging Europe Fund, which has a second-highest 51 percent of assets in Russia. The fund is down 37.2 percent this year on losing bets such as energy company Gazprom (down 33 percent) and local banking giant Sberbank (down 52 percent).