Top Stories
Top Stories
Careers

Best jobs for women in 2015

Situation improving
Westend61 | Getty Images

Women now make up nearly half the U.S. labor force, but for years their numbers have remained disproportionately low in some fields, such as science and engineering. Meanwhile, their numbers have remained high in other industries like education and care.

That may be starting to change.

A new analysis by CareerCast puts careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, so-called STEM jobs, at the top of the list in part because the ratio of women to men has started to shift and that's where the opportunity is. "Because technological jobs are such a bedrock of the 21st century economy, STEM employers would be wise to meet growing demand through the active hiring of more women," says Tony Lee, publisher at CareerCast. "While STEM fields are notorious for lacking gender diversity, some of the best jobs for women are bucking the trends."

CareerCast used data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to look at the percentage of women in certain fields, and how those numbers have grown over recent years. The study found that STEM jobs, such as statistician and biomedical engineer, were seeing many more women compared to a decade ago. The jobs listed in the study are in careers that show a growing percentage of women as compared with previous years. Six of the 11 careers on the list are STEM jobs.

Lee explained that more women are being sought after in historically male-dominated fields such as science, technology and engineering jobs, so breaking into those fields is not the challenge it was previously. However, there is still plenty of room for improvement. A Commerce Department report found that women hold less than one in four STEM jobs.

That doesn't mean there are fewer opportunities for advancement in professions that have historically drawn more women, though. "More women are becoming managers in fields they have dominated historically," Lee said. "That means more decision-making power and higher salaries for women."

Check out CareerCast's 11 best jobs for women this year.

By Reem Nasr
Posted 28 May 2015

Actuary
Jose Luis Pelaez Inc | Blend Images | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $93,680
Projected growth outlook: 26 percent

Advertising and promotions manager
Laflor | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $115,750
Projected growth outlook: 12 percent

Biomedical engineer
AlexRaths | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $86,960
Projected growth outlook: 27 percent

Dental hygienist
Uppercut Images | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $70,201
Projected growth outlook: 33 percent

Education administrator
Loretta Hostettler | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $86,490
Projected growth outlook: 15 percent

Event planner
Jetta Productions | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $45,810
Projected growth outlook: 33 percent

Human resources manager
Brankica Tekic | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $99,720
Projected growth outlook: 12 percent

Market research analyst
Alistair Berg | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $60,330
Projected growth outlook: 32 percent

Occupational therapist
Phil Fisk | Cultura | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $75,400
Projected growth outlook: 29 percent

Public relations manager
laflor | E+ | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $95,450
Projected growth outlook: 13 percent

Statistician
Monty Rakusen | Cultura | Getty Images

Annual median wage: $75,560
Projected growth outlook: 27 percent