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Early movers: KBIO, PBY, DD, COP, SEAS, FB & more

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Check out which companies are making headlines before the bell:

KaloBios Pharmaceuticals — The pharmaceutical company filed for bankruptcy protection, listing its assets and liabilities to be worth between $1 million and $10 million. The decision came after the company's stock was delisted by the Nasdaq and following the arrest of then-CEO MartinShkreli.

DDR Corp. — Deutsche Bank downgraded DDR's stock to "hold" from "buy," and lowered its price target to $17 a share from $19. "We are moving to the sidelines on DDR for the first time in years as we believe many of the catalysts that we thought would drive a compression of current multiple gap are now in the past," the bank said.

Marathon Oil, Schlumberger, ConocoPhillips — These three oil-related companies fell in premarket trading, as U.S. crude prices fell more than 2.5 percent.

DuPont — The Dow component said it plans to slash 1,700 jobs in Delaware at the beginning of next year, as it seeks to shed 10 percent of its workforce ahead of its merger with Dow Chemical.

SeaWorld — The company has filed a lawsuit against California to challenge a ruling by a state commission that bans breeding of captive orcas. The suit states the California Commission acted outside its authority in handing down the ruling in October.

Facebook — A federal judge certified two shareholder class action lawsuits against the tech giant, accusing it of hiding concerns about its growth forecasts ahead of its initial public offering in 2012.

Fairchild Semiconductor International — The company acknowledged it has received an offer from an unnamed bidder to buy all of its outstanding shares for $21.70 per stock. ON Semiconductor agreed to buy Fairchild for $20 a share in cash in November, and Fairchild said it remains subject to that agreement.

Pep Boys — Japanese tire maker Bridgestone pulled out of its bidding war for Pep Boys after activist investor Carl Icahn raised his bid to $18.50 per share.

— CNBC's Tom DiChristopher and Reuters contributed to this report.