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Twitter announces initiative to raise safety online

Twitter has created a council to advise it how it can make its users feel safer on the social media platform.

The Twitter Trust & Safety Council, which was announced Tuesday, is designed to provide the company with expertise and input as it develops new products and policies.

"With hundreds of millions of Tweets sent per day, the volume of content on Twitter is massive, which makes it extraordinarily complex to strike the right balance between fighting abuse and speaking truth to power," Patricia Cartes, Twitter's head of global policy outreach, said in a blog post.

Chris Ratcliffe | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The announcement came during Safer Internet Day, which was held in more than 100 countries with the aim of creating a kinder online community and encouraging the safe use of technology.

Statistics released on Safer Internet Day showed 24 percent of young people ages 13 to 18 in the U.K. have been the target of online abuse in the last year, and 74 percent said that online harassment made them more careful about what they said on the internet.

"Our Trust & Safety Council will help us tap into the expertise and input of organizations at the intersection of these issues more efficiently and quickly," Cartes said in her post.

The council will include safety advocates, academics, researchers, grassroots political organisations and community groups. It initially consists of 40 members from around the world, including Australia's Beyond Blue, which raises awareness about mental health, and the U.K.'s Childnet, which aims to make the Internet safer for children.

"We welcome opportunities to share the perspectives of young people, parents, carers, teachers and others with technology companies like Twitter to help shape the platforms so popular with young people," said Will Gardner, CEO of Childnet, to CNBC via email.

"So we are pleased to be part of Twitter's Trust and Safety Council. By working collaboratively we can help create a better internet for young people."

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