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Millennials are moving, but mortgages don’t follow

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Danger ahead for Millennials owning homes
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What it takes for millennials to own homes
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Cleaning up your credit score

It is the No. 1 barrier to entry for young, would-be homebuyers: credit. Millennials are the first generation to come of age in a post-almost-apocalyptic housing market, where lenders, eight years later, are still paying billions in reparations for mortgage misconduct and outright fraud.

Millennial homebuyers are also paying a price.

"The mortgage industry is poised to experience a monumental shift as more millennial homebuyers begin to enter the market," said Joe Tyrrell, executive vice president of corporate strategy at Ellie Mae, a mortgage software and data company. "There are roughly 87 million would-be homebuyers in the millennial generation and 91 percent of them say they intend to own a home one day. Lenders must prepare today to meet their needs."

While millennials are waiting longer to get married and have children, factors that are the primary drivers of homeownership, the leading edge is now entering the housing market. Millennials are even starting to move to the suburbs, and in fact, last year marked a turning point, where urban centers reached "peak millennial," according to a new study from Dowell Myers, a professor of urban planning and demography at the USC Price School of Public Policy.