Cramer Remix: The Brexit vote’s big, but the UK isn’t the only area to watch

Every time Jim Cramer goes to CNBC's headquarters in San Francisco, he is reminded just how short-term minded Wall Street is, and how important it is to think about the long term.

So, while the world is focused on the outcome of the Brexit vote, Cramer has his eye on Silicon Valley. That is why he decided to go down the list of technology companies changing the business, and how the innovation they bring to the table could change investor portfolios.

The oddest company that surfaced was Twitter. No one can stop talking about Twitter. Cramer boiled it down to two reasons: First, everyone is on it, checking what is happening. The second reason was that after LinkedIn got its monster bid from Microsoft, everyone wants to know who will bid for Twitter.

Will it be Facebook? Apple? Microsoft? Salesforce? Alphabet?

"They speak of Twitter as if it's some diamond in the rough that is sitting in the ground, and the only thing you need to do is get it out, polish it and make it worthwhile is to get rid of the company's current management. It might as well be the last diamond mine left to grab," Cramer said.

Twitter
Regis Duvignau | Reuters

Cramer was intrigued when Micron Technology suddenly got its groove back on Thursday.

Micron jumped a monster 10 percent after it was upgraded by both Susquehanna and Nomura. And the good news is that Cramer thinks this isn't just the stock playing catch up. This could be the beginning of something good.

"It looks to me like a major turn could be unfolding, with not one but several product lines doing better," the "Mad Money" host said.

Tesla might have made some major announcements recently, but Ford CEO Mark Fields says his company not in the race to make announcements. Instead, Ford is busy focusing on how to make customer's lives easier and building the car of the future.

"Our combination is an auto and a mobility company, and we think that makes a lot of sense for us. But we're not in a race to make announcements. We are in a race to do what's right for our customers, and what's right for our business," Fields said.

In an interview at Ford's research and innovation center in Palo Alto, CA on Thursday, Fields described to Cramer what the car of the future will look like.

"What I am most excited about here is the innovation that is going on. The innovation is who we are as a business, going back to Henry Ford," Fields said.

Ford CEO Mark Fields
Ashlee Espinal | CNBC
Ford CEO Mark Fields

In addition to watching the publicly traded companies on the tape in Silicon Valley, Cramer also likes to monitor privately held companies off the tape that could be disrupting their industries with revolutionary concepts.

Robinhood is a brokerage company that allows investors to sell U.S. stocks for free. Not only is there no commission, but customers can trade directly from their smartphone using Robinhood's app.

The company has managed to trim expenses because it has no storefront locations, no marketing and no account managers. The entire platform is electronic. Instead, it makes money by collecting interest on the cash sitting in customer accounts. It also plans to roll out margin trading, which could also generate revenue.

Robinhood has handled over $6 billion in trading volumes, and earlier this month it announced a partnership with Baidu with plans to expand in China. To learn more, Cramer spoke with Robinhood's founders Vlad Tenev and Baiju Bhatt.

"One really interesting fact about our users that has us more excited than anything else is that the generation of these consumers — they're much younger. Our consumer on average is about 30 years old, which is a big difference in the online brokerage customers," Bhatt said.


In the Lightning Round, Cramer gave his take on a few caller favorite stocks:

Skywest: "One of the few airlines that is doing very well. I've got to tell you, I think the rest could play catch up. So I want you to stay in it."

Dave & Busters: "Dave & Busters had a remarkable quarter. I'm surprised the stock isn't up even more. I really like it very much."