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US bonds rise ahead of Fed and BOJ meetings

U.S. sovereign bond prices were mixed on Monday, as investors looked ahead to the Federal Open Market Committee meeting, which begins on Tuesday.

Benchmark 10-year notes gained to yield 1.6988 percent, while thirty-year bonds yielded 2.4491 percent. Bond yields move inversely to bond prices.

German bunds — perceived as "safe-haven" assets akin to U.S. Treasury notes — fell on Monday.

U.S. crude futures settled at $43.30 a barrel, up 27 cents or 0.63 percent.



Treasury yields

Symbol
Yield
 
Change
US 3-MO
---
US 2-YR
---
US 5-YR
---
US 10-YR
---
US 30-YR
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All eyes will be on the U.S. Federal Reserve's policy announcement on Wednesday at the end of its two-day September meeting. Market consensus is for the Fed to hold its base rate at 0.25-0.50 percent.

"With the key event of the week on Wednesday, and not a lot of market-driving news before then, it could be a slow start but I'm still bond-watching and the market's still long 10-year notes," Kit Juckes, strategist at Societe Generale, said in a note on Monday.

"At the moment, the rates market prices a 55 percent chance of a hike by December and the Federal Open Market Committee may need that probability to increase to provide room for them to act. A rate hike this week seems very improbable … the need to lay the ground for action after the U.S. election seems clear enough. Any significant (more than 10-basis point) rise in 10-year yields is likely to be felt in a further correction for risk assets and currencies, globally," he later added.

Like the Fed, the Bank of Japan will start its two-day policy meeting on Tuesday, with an announcement the day after.

Japanese bonds fell on Monday.

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The U.S. dollar fell against a basket of currencies on Wednesday, but held most of last week's gains, with traders positioning themselves ahead of the Fed's meeting.

New York City remained on high alert after an explosion in Manhattan injured 29 people in what State Governor Andrew Cuomo described as a "clear act of terrorism." A separate bomb device was later found in Elizabeth, New Jersey, which exploded when examined by a police robot.

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