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Why the price tag for inaugural safety may go up

Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., center, reacts to the technique of Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., far left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., participate in a First Nail Ceremony that launches the construction of the Inaugural platform on the West Front of the Capitol, September 21, 2016.
Tom Williams | CQ Roll Call | Getty Images
Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., center, reacts to the technique of Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., far left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., participate in a First Nail Ceremony that launches the construction of the Inaugural platform on the West Front of the Capitol, September 21, 2016.

With the inauguration just 62 days away, CNBC has learned the amount of money originally set aside for the District of Columbia for inaugural safety and infrastructure spending is not enough, prompting the city to ask Congress for an additional $10 million for Donald Trump's swearing in.

The city was appropriated $19.9 million in the president's budget for both security and inauguration-associated infrastructure costs. That allocation pales in comparison to allocations to Cleveland and Philadelphia, the host cities for the Republican or Democratic national conventions, which each received $50 million to pay for security.

But with a meeting Friday between Tom Barrack, chairman of the inaugural committee with D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, and homeland security officials, it was anticipated the price tag for security and infrastructure could go even higher.

The final inauguration budget for the Jan. 20 event hinges on the proposed event calendar the Trump Presidential Committee puts together, said Chris Geldart, director of the District of Columbia's Homeland Security Emergency Management Agency (HSEMA), which oversees the district's planning for the presidential inauguration. "We will know if we need to increase our budget based on the amount of events they want to have." The presidential inaugural period is officially five days before and four days after the date of inauguration.

The Presidential Inauguration Stand is seen under construction from the newly-restored Capitol Dome at the US Capitol on November 15, 2016 in Washington, D.C.
Getty Images
The Presidential Inauguration Stand is seen under construction from the newly-restored Capitol Dome at the US Capitol on November 15, 2016 in Washington, D.C.

HSEMA concentrates on the security and safety of inaugural attendees and started planning for the inauguration back in April, meetings with federal authorities began in July. Based on those meetings, the current budget for the HSEMA is $29.9 million for the 18-20 district agencies assisting in the coverage.

"If more events are added beyond the balls, swearing in ceremony and religious service, the budget could increase to cover more area and security," explained Geldart. "For example, Obama did a whistle stop tour. That added to the budget because of the manpower needed to cover the event." HSEMA went back to Congress in July asking for the additional $10 million.

The agency started planning for the inauguration back in April and started their meetings with federal authorities in July. Based on those meetings, the current budget for the HSEMA is $29.9 million for the 18-20 district agencies assisting in the coverage.

"If more events are added beyond the balls, swearing in ceremony and religious service, the budget could increase," Geldart.said. "For example, Obama did a whistle stop tour. That added to the budget because of the manpower needed to cover the event."

Crowds are estimated to be less than the Obama 2009 inauguration but more than the 2013 inauguration, between 800,00 and 900,000 people. But that number could change. "Over the coming month, we will keep in touch with the hotel association, church organizations and bus providers to give us a better understanding of that number," said Geldart. "We have A, B, and C plans already in place. If we see crowds as large as at the historic 2009 inauguration of President Obama, we are ready to park buses along roadways and if needed along (Route) 395. But we are not anticipating that."

As of right now, 3,000 law enforcement officials from departments around the country and 7,000 national guardsman will be securing and coordinating crowd control.

This is not the first inauguration where Washington, D.C. would request additional funds. For the 2009 inauguration, Washington, D.C., Virginia and Maryland requested $75 million from the federal government to offset the costs of extra police, fire and medical services used during the days around the inauguration.

Geldart stressed if no additional monies were allocated to D.C. that does not mean it would impact the security provided. "We will still direct the proper amount of security necessary as well as build the infrastructure needed for the inaugural events. We will make sure the nation has a peaceful transition of power from one president to another."