North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory Files for Recount as Challenger's Lead Grows

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory tells supporters that the results of his contest against Democratic challenger Roy Cooper will be contested, while his wife Ann looks on, in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. November 9, 2016.
Jonathan Drake | Reuters
North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory tells supporters that the results of his contest against Democratic challenger Roy Cooper will be contested, while his wife Ann looks on, in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. November 9, 2016.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory has formally requested a statewide recount of votes in his close race with Democratic challenger Roy Cooper, NBC News has learned. Meanwhile, pressure continues to mount on the incumbent Republican to concede two weeks after the election.

McCrory finished less than 10,000 votes behind Cooper, the state's attorney general, allowing him the opportunity to ask for a recount under North Carolina law. Yet Cooper's lead has only grown since Election Day, jumping from less than 5,000 votes to 6,311 as of Tuesday afternoon, according to the State Board of Elections website.

McCrory has repeatedly raised concerns of voter fraud, filing complaints in about half of the state's 100 counties. Yet no evidence of widespread fraud has surfaced so far. Furthermore, many of McCrory's own Republican appointees serving on local county election boards have rejected his complaints.

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In a statement Tuesday, McCrory's campaign manager doubled down on their concerns about the legitimacy of the state's elections results.

"With many outstanding votes yet to be counted for the first time, legal challenges, ballot protests and voter fraud allegations, we must keep open the ability to allow the established recount process to ensure every legal vote is counted properly," said Russell Peck, McCrory's campaign manager.