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Jill Stein's recount requests in PA, WI progress; may still file in MI

Recount requests filed by the Green Party's Jill Stein continue to gain momentum in key swing states as her campaign raises millions in a matter of days.

Stein said she plans to request a recount in Michigan over its 16 electoral votes as similar cases progress in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. Donald Trump was the apparent winner in all three states, defeating Hillary Clinton by margins in the range of tens of thousands of votes.

While the effort has raised more than $6 million, Stein's campaign said in a statement the average donation was about $46.

The recounts would not change the election outcome for Stein, who finished fourth behind Libertarian Gary Johnson, but there is a very small chance they could flip the states for Clinton.

That result remains highly unlikely, as the Democrat would need to overcome Trump's winning margins in all three states to wrest the Electoral College majority from him. Clinton currently leads Trump by more than 2 million in the popular vote, according to an ongoing count by the Cook Political Report.

Clinton's campaign has said it will participate in the recount in Wisconsin while Trump claims the process is a "scam."

In a Monday statement, Stein's campaign said, "The recount funds are being held in a dedicated account, separate from Stein's Presidential campaign treasury, and will be used to pay for all costs associated with the recounts, including required payments to states, lawyers, volunteer recruitment and other technical assistance."

Below is the latest on the recounts:

Wisconsin

On Monday, the Wisconsin Elections Commission unanimously approved a timeline and steps for a presidential election recount, following petitions from Stein and Reform Party presidential nominee Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente.

Trump was the apparent winner of the state's 10 electoral votes.

The commission said a recount order is contingent on a full payment for the process due Tuesday. If that payment is received, the recount in Wisconsin would begin on Thursday. The commission said Monday that it estimates the recount to cost $3.5 million, more than half of what Stein's campaign has raised.

Stein initially requested a statewide recount by hand, but the Wisconsin Elections Commission said that the campaign would need a court order for that to occur.

Pennsylvania

Legal representation for the Stein campaign filed a lawsuit Monday on behalf of 100 voters in Pennsylvania requesting a statewide recount. The case says a "primary purpose of the recounts" is to "determine if computer intrusions or hacking of electronic systems impacted the results" and includes an affidavit from a computer science professor.

NBC News reported that the deadline to request a precinct-by-precinct recount has already passed, but the lawsuit filed today requests a statewide recount.

The Keystone State's 20 electoral votes pushed Trump beyond the 270 needed to win the presidency.

The Republican Party of Pennsylvania responded, saying the petition is "totally and completely without any merit."

"It does not even allege any facts to support its wild claim that the 'discontinuity' of pre-election polls reported by the media showing that Hillary Clinton would win and the actual results could only have occurred through computer hacking originated by a foreign government," Rob Gleason, chairman of the Republican Party of Pennsylvania, said in a statement. "This desperate act by Jill Stein and those supporting her is a sad commentary on the failure of some to accept the results of the will of the people as reflected by their votes."

Michigan

On Monday, the Michigan Board of State Canvassers certified that Trump won the Great Lakes State and its 16 electoral votes, besting Clinton by 10,704 votes.

Monday's results brings Trump's total electoral vote count to 306 versus Clinton's 228, according to NBC News' ongoing tally.

Stein's campaign said in a statement it plans to demand a statewide hand-count of the results in Michigan on Wednesday.