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Cramer Remix: What Trump's crackdown on UTX means for the market

With a slew of President-elect Donald Trump tweets coming in over the weekend, Cramer is starting to wonder about the potential downsides to a Trump administration.

"While the positives of Trump's agenda still outweigh the negatives, at least as far as the stock market is concerned, the winner's circle has definitely gotten smaller," the "Mad Money" host said.

It has become clear to Cramer that Trump is serious about cracking down on manufacturers that ship jobs overseas. He was also concerned that Trump spoke with the Taiwanese president — something no American president has done since Nixon.

Cramer also spoke with United Technologies CEO Greg Hayes, which is the parent company of Carrier, and weighed in on what Trump's efforts to pressure companies to keep jobs at home could mean for manufacturing in America.

"Say what you will about offshoring, it is a very effective way for companies to cut costs, and it is bad for manufacturers if this suddenly becomes a politically fraught issue," Cramer said.

Hayes told Cramer in an exclusive interview on Monday about his conversation with Donald Trump last week, and says there was no "quid pro quo" with the president-elect.

"I think we came up with a relatively good solution for everybody … We still got to do the preponderance of the restructuring, which we were going to do anyways. So it's — I would say no 'deal,' but at the end of the day a good deal for UTC," Hayes said,

Ultimately, United Technologies agreed to receive $7 million in tax credits from the State of Indiana, issued at $700,000 per year for 10 years. Carrier also agreed to invest approximately $16 million in its Indiana facilities, and will keep more than 1,000 people employed in Indianapolis.

"I was born at night, but it wasn't last night," Hayes said. "I also know that about 10 percent of our revenue comes from the U.S. government."

Hayes said that a Trump administration could potentially bring a "better" regulatory environment and a lower tax rate, which could help United Technologies in the long run.

President-elect Donald Trump
Getty Images
President-elect Donald Trump

It was approximately one year ago that the stock market was fearfully hanging on every word uttered by the Federal Reserve. Cramer says the market has changed its tune.

"Now we don't even bother to listen to the Fed governors and presidents as they speak. Our new attitude? Give me a rate hike or give me death — or at least death to the bull," he said.

Suddenly it seemed to Cramer that the market can now shrug off startling news from overseas that would have caused a sell-off not that long ago. The market barely blinked when Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi announced his intention to resign on Sunday night.

Cramer also turned his attention to Polaroid Swing, a privately held company stemming from the partnership between the old Polaroid brand and fresh-faced tech company Swing, which is redefining photography for mobile.

Polaroid Swing has a mobile app that allows users to take one-second snapshots that are essentially micro-videos, with pictures that move with a simple phone tilt.

Cramer spoke with Polaroid Swing's co-founder Tommy Stadlen, who said he was inspired by the brand of Polaroid.

"We felt if we could combine the design heritage with the iconic brand of Polaroid with pioneering photo technology, we could do something special," Stadlen said.

In the Lightning Round, Cramer gave his take on a few stocks from callers:

Twilio: "The problem is that Twilio has got what's known as a lockup expiry, more stock hitting the market. We are going to wait to see what happens, because lately those things have been busting the stock. But I do like the stock long-term, but let's wait."

Himax Technologies: "That is a bit of an eagle stock right now. We've got so many companies like an NVIDIA that are doing well, I can't just ... I'd rather buy an NVIDIA."