Here's how Asian and European markets performed in 2016

Asian and European markets are now closed for 2016. Here are the best and worst performers — and the results may surprise you.

Asia in 2016

Indonesia's Jakarta Composite Index was one of the top Asian benchmarks of the year, up 15.32 percent. The index turned in its best year since 2014 when it gained 22.29 percent. Jakarta was down 1.27 percent in the fourth quarter, resulting in its first negative quarter in five.

Taiwan's Taiex index finished the year up 10.98 percent, its best year since 2013 when it gained 11.85 percent. 2016 was also its fourth positive year in five.

Australia's ASX 200 ended 2016 up 6.99 percent for its best year since 2013 when it gained 15.13 percent. The index was up 4.2 percent in the fourth quarter, resulting in its third consecutive positive quarter for the first time since the second quarter of 2014.

Japan's Nikkei narrowly achieved its fifth consecutive positive year for the first time since 1989 — the same year its 12-year win streak came to an end. The index barely finished higher, ending up 0.42 percent.

Hong Kong's Hang Seng index also barely finished positive, up 0.39 percent. That results in the index's fourth positive year in five.

China's Shanghai Composite ended the year down 12.3 percent, resulting in its worst year since 2011 when the index lost 21.68 percent.

Europe in 2016

Russia's RTS index ended 2016 up 52.22 percent, turning in its best year since 2009 when the it gained 128.62 percent.

Norway's Oslo OBX ended the year up 14.6 percent.

Great Britain's FTSE 100 ended the year up 14.4 percent, turning in its first positive year since 2013.

The U.K.'s FTSE 250 finished the year up 3.71 percent for its fifth consecutive positive year for the first time since its six-year win streak ended in 2000.

Germany's DAX ended the year up 6.87 percent for its first five-year win streak since the last one ended in 2007.

France's CAC 40 ended the year up 4.86 percent for its second consecutive positive year and its fourth positive year in five.

STOXX Europe 600 ended the year down 1.2 percent for its first negative year since 2011.

STOXX Europe 600 Banks lost 6.77 percent in 2016 — its worst year since 2011 when the index fell 32.48 percent. It also turned in its third consecutive negative year for the first time ever in its 30-year history.

Italy's FTSE MIB ended the year down 10.2 percent for its first negative year since 2011 when it lost 25.2 percent.

An investor obverses the screen at an exchange hall in Nanjing, China.
VCG | VCG | Getty Images
An investor obverses the screen at an exchange hall in Nanjing, China.

— CNBC's Gina Francolla contributed to this report.