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Trump didn't believe birther conspiracy theories, son-in-law reportedly says

President-elect Donald Trump embraces son in law Jared Kushner (R), as his daughter Ivanka Trump, (L), stands nearby, after his acceptance speech at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City.
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President-elect Donald Trump embraces son in law Jared Kushner (R), as his daughter Ivanka Trump, (L), stands nearby, after his acceptance speech at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City.

Donald Trump's son-in-law told acquaintances the president-elect didn't really believe his own claims that President Barack Obama was born outside the U.S., New York magazine reported.

Back when Trump continuously peddled birther conspiracy theories, a person who spoke with Jared Kushner said the son-in-law assured that Trump didn't really believe it, according to the magazine. Despite suggesting the contrary for years, Trump eventually admitted he believed the president was born in America.

CNBC has reached out to Kushner's real estate business and the Trump transition team for comment.

Kushner, husband of Ivanka Trump, had little political experience before Trump's campaign but has became an influential advisor. Concerns about mixing business and politics followed the Trump family since the election, however.

People who knew Kushner said his decision to leave behind his business, political affiliations, and friendships for Trump was "mystifying," according to the magazine. Kushner continues to defend Trump.

"People say he's unhinged," Kushner told one associate, according to the magazine. "I think he unhinged everyone else."

Ivanka Trump and Kushner are reportedly looking at houses in Washington as the president-elect forms his Cabinet.

Read the full report from the New York magazine here.

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