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Don’t get too excited! Cramer says the market’s new highs have nothing to do with Trump

As the criticisms of President Donald Trump's approach continue to pile up, Jim Cramer reminded investors that the recent strength in the stock market is not because of Trump.

Instead, it is based on earnings and the belief that companies can do even better.

"There is a lot of raw emotion when it comes to Trump and when people get emotional, even really smart professional money managers, they stop being able to analyze the situation objectively," the "Mad Money" host said.

Cramer referred to the New York Times column from Andrew Ross Sorkin that highlighted respected hedge fund manager Seth Klarman entitled "A Quiet Investing Giant's View on Trump." Klarman wrote a private letter to his investors two weeks ago, stating that the euphoria since the election has created "perilously high valuations."

This perfectly captured the consensus view that is shared by many money managers and members of the mainstream media, Cramer said.

Donald Trump
Jonathan Drake | Reuters
Donald Trump

While Cramer does agree that Trump's method of tweeting his perspective is "the most thoughtless way to communicate since two cups attached on a string," he doesn't think the president is unpredictable. His approach may not be presidential, but it may not be a reason to sell stocks.

"It's been a pretty awful bet to sell since he got elected, and what you saw on the campaign trail is what you are getting right now, pretty much to a T," Cramer said.

As for the "perilously high valuations," the market continues to hit new highs, signaling to Cramer that stocks aren't roaring higher for no reason like they did in 1999. It is based on real earnings, and the market has had plenty of time since the election for a sell-off.

Ultimately, a pro-business president is good for business, Cramer said. A pro-capital president is good for capital. Investors may hate that agenda, but they aren't investing in Trump-per-share. They are measuring earnings-per-share, and when it comes to Trump, he is always predictable when it comes to American business — he loves it.

"The new highs we keep hitting are real, they are based on earnings, even if the gains could be erased if Trump truly goes off the reservation," Cramer said.

There may be a correction one day, and Cramer recommended maybe investors should raise cash for that event. Maybe the president will tell the Chinese he is done tomorrow and they can't sell in the U.S. anymore. That could cause a crash, Cramer said. Or maybe Trump calls for a Chinese boycott. That would bring down earnings.

"As far as I'm concerned, things are better and that, not Trump, might be the real secret sauce behind this extraordinary and very real rally," Cramer said.

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