×

After-hours buzz: FIVE, CTAS, PVH & more


A statue of a girl facing the Wall Street Bull in the financial district in New York.
Brendan McDermid | Reuters
A statue of a girl facing the Wall Street Bull in the financial district in New York.

Check out which companies are making headlines after the bell:

Shares of Five Below soared 8 percent in extended trading Monday after the company reported earnings in line with expectations. The discount retailer reported earnings at 90 cents per share, as expected by analysts, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates. Revenue for the company came in lower than expected. Five Below reported revenue of $388 million versus $394 million expected, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates.

Shares of Cintas rose 1 percent after the company reported earnings slightly above expectations, and also revenue in line with Wall Street estimates. The company reported earnings of $1.08 per share, beating analyst estimates by 1 cent, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates. Cintas said its third-quarter revenue came in at $1.28 billion, matching the Street's expectation, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates.

PVH shares flew 7 percent higher after the clothing retailer reported earnings above analysts' expectations. The Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein parent company reported earnings per share at $1.23 per share versus $1.19 per share projected by analysts, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates. PVH also beat analysts' expectations on revenue in its fourth-quarter. The company reported $2.11 billion in revenue versus $2.09 billion expected, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates.

Herman Miller shares popped 5 percent higher after the company beat earnings expectations. The furniture manufacturer reported earnings at 39 cents per share while 32 cents per share was expected, according to Thomson Reuters consensus estimates. Herman Miller did miss revenue expectations, reporting $524.9 million, while $530.5 million was expected by analysts, according to FactSet.