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Schiff: ‘More Than Circumstantial Evidence’ Trump Associates Colluded With Russia

WASHINGTON — The top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee claimed Wednesday evening that he has seen "more than circumstantial evidence" that associates of President Donald Trump colluded with Russia while the Kremlin attempted to interfere with the 2016 presidential election.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., the Ranking Member on the committee, was asked by Chuck Todd on "Meet The Press Daily" whether or not he only has a circumstantial case.

"Actually no, Chuck," he said. "I can tell you that the case is more than that and I can't go into the particulars, but there is more than circumstantial evidence now."

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Questioned whether or not he has seen direct evidence of collusion, Schiff responded, "I don't want to get into specifics but I will say that there is evidence that is not circumstantial and is very much worthy of an investigation."

That is a shift from Sunday's "Meet the Press" interview, when Schiff only went as far as to say that there was circumstantial evidence of collusion and "direct evidence" of deception.

The Trump campaign and the White House have repeatedly denied that Trump's associates were at all connected to any activities related to Russia's attempts to influence the last election.

Schiff's comments came after Republican committee chair Devin Nunes said that he had seen reports from the U.S. intelligence community showing communication from members of the transition team — and possibly the president himself — were "incidentally collected" as part of a broader surveillance effort.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, responds to committee chairman Devin Nunes's comments earlier in the day about incidental collection of communications relating to U.S. President Donald Trump during the period of the presidential transition March 22, 2017 in Washington, DC.
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Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, responds to committee chairman Devin Nunes's comments earlier in the day about incidental collection of communications relating to U.S. President Donald Trump during the period of the presidential transition March 22, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Nunes said it appeared most of the information was collected after the election and during the transition, it appears it was collected legally, and none of it was related to Russia or the investigation into Russia. He said he did not know who ordered the alleged surveillance.

The disclosure drew condemnation from some Democrats. Schiff bristled at the fact that Nunes did not share the information with him before updating reporters and the White House.

"The chairman will need to decide whether he is the chairman of an independent investigation into conduct, which includes allegations of potential coordination between the Trump campaign and the Russians, or he's going to act as a surrogate of the White House. Because he cannot do both," Schiff said.

Nunes said at a press conference that "the intelligence community incidentally collected information about American citizens involved in the Trump transition."

"From what I know right now it looks like incidental collection, we don't know exactly how that was picked up, but we're are trying to get to the bottom of it," Nunes said.

Trump said he felt somewhat vindicated by Nunes' disclosure: "I somewhat do. I very much appreciated the fact that they found what they found," the president said.

Nunes said he has not seen any evidence that former President Barack Obama had Trump's "wires tapped" before the election — a claim Trump made on Twitter. The director of the FBI said Monday he has no evidence backing up the tweeted claim.

Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Virginia, said he was "absolutely mystified by Chairman Nunes' actions," and the decision to brief Trump on the information "seems pretty inappropriate to me."

Republican Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, told MSNBC's Greta Van Susteren that the back-and-forth among the top members of the committee was "bizarre" and he said partisan fighting had cost Congress its credibility to investigate Russian interference the election.

"No longer does the Congress have credibility to handle this alone, and I don't say that lightly," McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said.

On Monday, FBI Director James Comey confirmed that an investigation into the Trump campaign's ties to Russia had been ongoing since July. Comey said the probe was included in the agency's investigation into what the U.S. intelligence community concluded was an attempt by Russia to interfere with the 2016 election with the purpose of helping Trump win.

The House and Senate Intelligence Committees are conducting their own investigations.

Two weeks ago on "Meet The Press," James Clapper, the former Director of National Intelligence under President Obama, said that to his knowledge, there was no evidence of collusion between Moscow and Trump associates. Clapper oversaw the work of U.S. intelligence agencies through January 20th.

On Wednesday, Schiff told Todd of Clapper's statements, "All I can tell you is reviewing the evidence that I have, I don't think you can conclude that at all — far from it."