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CNBC Internship Testimonial: Jordan Santo, 'Closing Bell' Intern 2014

Jordan Santo
Adam Jeffery | CNBC
Jordan Santo

When you're an intern for "Closing Bell," you're a trusted member of the team — starting on Day One.

The show's producers encourage interns to play an active role in all facets of production, including contributing to the team's daily morning brainstorm, building graphics and pulling video, pre-interviewing influential guests and operating the real-time stock charts during the live broadcast.

What makes the "Closing Bell" internship so valuable is that everything you work on makes it to air. There's no stereotypical intern work. You're in the trenches day-in and day-out with some of the most talented news producers in the business, from the news associates all the way up to the executive producer.

One of the benefits of being a CNBC intern is that you're a part of the NBCUniversal Campus 2 Career Internship Program. The program hosts networking opportunities, social events and informational sessions throughout the summer that encourage you to explore potential full-time opportunities following your time as an intern. This is where I found out about my next step at NBCUniversal — the esteemed NBC Page Program.

During my time as a page at NBCUniversal, I worked across many notable brands, including "Saturday Night Live" and "The Tonight Show," and held positions at several branches of the NBC News Group, including "The TODAY Show," MSNBC's "Morning Joe," CNBC and the NBC News Election Unit.

Following my time as an NBC page, I rejoined CNBC as an analyst on the network's strategic content and news partnerships team working on on-air and digital special reports including Disruptor 50, Upstart 25, Top States for Business, the iConic Conference series. I also work with external data partners Kensho and M-CAM, helping to launch the CNBC IQ 100 Index.

Everything that I learned during my time as an intern at CNBC, along with the connections made, have helped to grow my career immensely. It's cliche to say, but I don't know where I'd be today had it not been for my time as a CNBC intern.