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The GOP congressional districts that may face the biggest health care backlash

Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a news conference with members the GOP caucus in the Capitol Visitor Center to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the ACA, April 6, 2017.
Tom Williams | CQ Roll Call | Getty Images
Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a news conference with members the GOP caucus in the Capitol Visitor Center to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the ACA, April 6, 2017.

A report this week on how many Americans will likely lose health coverage under a bill passed by the House GOP raises the stakes for Republicans in districts where voters are at risk.

The bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, which Congressional Democrats opposed in a party line vote, would leave some 23 million fewer Americans with health insurance coverage by 2026 if it becomes law, the Congressional Budget Office projected Wednesday.

Only 20 percent of American voters said they would be "more likely" to vote for a Senator or member of Congress who supports the Republican plan, while 44 percent say they are "less likely," according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday.

Congressional Republicans who won their races by narrow margins are especially vulnerable, along with 23 GOP members from districts that voted for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump.

Here's a look at districts that seen the biggest gains in health care enrollments since Obamacare was introduced in 2010, and where Congressional Republicans won by the slimmest margins.

Districts are shaded based on the margin of victory; darker shades represent larger margins. Circles represent Obamacare enrollments, sized by the number of people who have signed up.

Democrats are hoping to use a voter backlash to their advantage in 2018 elections. An advocacy group that supports Obamacare is going after 24 House Republicans who voted for the repeal-and-replace bill, using a television and digital ad campaign.

Voters are worried that the GOP plan will raise the cost of coverage, according to the Quinnipiac poll. Some 44 percent of American voters expect their costs to go up, while 12 percent say they will go down and 33 percent say they will stay the same.

The poll found that 57 percent of voters think fewer Americans will be covered under the GOP plan, while 11 percent say more will be covered and 21 percent say it will be about the same, according to the poll.

Watch: CBO scores GOP health care bill

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