76 police injured as G-20 protesters march in Hamburg

Share
×

Politics

76 police injured as G-20 protesters march in Hamburg

Riot police use water cannon to put of burning bins as a protester holds a flag after the 'Welcome to Hell' rally against the G20 summit in Hamburg, northern Germany on July 6, 2017.
Odd Andersen | AFP | Getty Images

Protesters have taken to the streets of Hamburg, Germany, for the second day of anti-capitalism demonstrations as world leaders prepare to meet for this weekend's 12th annual G-20 summit.

Tens of thousands of people marched across the port city Thursday to display their frustrations about societal inequalities in what they dubbed a "Welcome to Hell" rally.

Seventy-six police officers were injured when they clashed with protesters, three of whom were taken to hospital for treatment. Officers were seen using water cannons and pepper spray to deter masked protesters who hurled stones and damaged cars and businesses.

At least one protester is known to have been seriously hurt, though medics were also seen treating other injured demonstrators.

Security has been heightened further Friday as the leaders of the world's largest economies come together to discuss pressing international issues including trade, defense, and climate change.

For some, this will be their first meeting. President Donald Trump is to meet face-to-face with Russian President Vladimir Putin for the first time this afternoon in what will be a crucial meeting in determining the course of U.S.-Russian relations.

In his first major European address in Poland Thursday, Trump appeared to set the tone, criticizing Moscow for its "destabilizing actions" in Ukraine and its support for the "hostile regimes" of Syria and Iran.

Trump later met in Hamburg with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who is hosting this year's summit.

Such protests are not unheard of during G-20 meetings, but they will sit particularly uncomfortably with the German leader and de facto head of the EU, who is seeking to present a united front during what are set to be particularly testing talks, in which some leaders are divided on major issues.

They are also potentially damaging to the Chancellor's domestic political career, as she is currently campaigning for her fourth term ahead of September's German elections.

  • Welcome to Hell

    Protesters march in unison brandishing a "G20 Welcome 2 Hell" banner, the phrase adopted to surmise the demonstrations.

    Demonstrators attend the Welcome to Hell anti-G20 protest march near Hamburg harbor on July 6, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
    Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images
  • 'We are f--king angry'

    Hamburg's streets and sidewalks are filled with marchers and a truck displaying the sign 'We are f**king angry'.

    Protesters march during the 'Welcome to Hell' rally against the G20 summit in Hamburg, northern Germany on July 6, 2017.
    Axel Heimken | AFP | Getty Images
  • Attack on capitalism

    A woman is seen holding a wad of fake U.S. dollars in an overt criticism of elitist politicians and the capitalist values they represent.

    A woman holds up a handful of fake US currency during the Welcome to Hell anti-G20 protest march on July 7, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
    Leon Neal | Getty Images
  • Worn down

    Some protesters used art to show their disdain. This demonstration representing the working man sees performers wearing encrusted, gray clothes to illustrate the restraints of society.

    Art performance in Germany, Hamburg on 7 July 2017
    Markus Heine | NurPhoto | Getty Images
  • Police clash

    Police come up against an estimated 12,000 demonstrators who filled the streets city-wide.

    Police stand in front of the Welcome to Hell anti-G20 protest march at Hamburg harbor on July 6, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
    Thomas Lohnes | Getty Images
  • A display of dummies

    Others chose to depict the world leaders in attendance with a series of over-sized dummy heads.

    Anti-capitalism activists wearing masks of (L-R) Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, US President Donald Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel during a protest on July 6, 2017 in Hamburg
    Odd Andersen | AFP | Getty Images
  • Peaceful demonstrations

    A woman stands with her hands out in a demonstration of peace when confronted by German police.

    Protesters take part in the 'Welcome to Hell' protest march on July 6, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
    Alexander Koerner | Getty Images
  • Water cannons

    Some displays were less peaceful and police resorted to using water cannons to abate oncoming protesters.

    A demonstrator stands in the water jet from police water cannon in front of the Rote Flora left-wing centre after the 'Welcome to Hell' protest march on July 6, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
    Thomas Lohnes | Getty Images
  • Clear defiance

    A man faces a direct hit from water cannons in an act of defiance against authorities.

    Riot police use water cannon during the 'Welcome to Hell' rally against the G20 summit in Hamburg, northern Germany on July 6, 2017.
    Steffi Loos | AFP | Getty Images
  • Signs of unrest

    Graffiti and signs of protest leave a lasting reminder of the deep-seated divisions among the world's most influential leaders and the people they govern.

    Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.

    Police Forces clash with protesters during a march on July 7, 2017 in Hamburg, Germany.
    Maciej Luczniewski | NurPhoto | Getty Images