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Warren Buffett is a full-time investor, but part-time lounge act

  • Buffett, a big Glenn Miller fan, is never far from his ukulele.
  • The billionaire investor has performed duets with Jon Bon Jovi, Stevie Wonder and Paul Anka.
Stevie Wonder and Warren Buffett perform a duet at the Forbes Media Centennial Celebration at Pier 60 on September 19, 2017 in New York City.
Source: YouTube
Stevie Wonder and Warren Buffett perform a duet at the Forbes Media Centennial Celebration at Pier 60 on September 19, 2017 in New York City.

Warren Buffett may be famous for his investing skill, but his lounge act isn't bad, either.

He took to the stage as recently as Tuesday night, at the centennial party for Forbes magazine in New York, where he teamed up with Stevie Wonder to sing Billy Hill's 1936 classic "The Glory of Love."

Buffett likes the song, or at least knows all the words to it, because he also sang it and accompanied on the ukulele at another Forbes party a few years ago. That duet was with Jon Bon Jovi, who played along on the guitar. "Groupies!" Buffett yelled to a laughing audience, "I've been waiting all my life."

Three years ago the Oracle of Omaha teamed up with Paul Anka to serenade Fortune magazine reporter Carol Loomis in a reworded rendition of Frank Sinatra's "My Way." And he played the ukulele and sang along with the Quebe Sisters at his annual meeting in 2008, with a version of "Red River Valley."

Buffett sang for CNN host Piers Morgan in 2013, admitting he never met Sinatra but he likes "My Way." He did forget some of the words that time.

He also accompanied himself on ukulele while singing the Coca-Cola song for a 100th birthday tribute to his favorite soft drink.

But fortunately for Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, at least, Buffett never quit his day job. His youngest son, Peter, is the real musician in the family. In a Forbes interview published earlier this year, Peter Buffett said his father is a "die-hard" Glenn Miller fan, and though he didn't go into business like his dad, the elder Buffett appreciates his career nonetheless.

"I'm in music, he's in business – is he disappointed? I tell them we do the same thing, what we love," Peter Buffett told Forbes. "And that's what he infused as we grew up, and my mother did as well. Find something you love, that's the key."

That is the advice Buffett gives in Loomis' book about him, "Tap Dancing to Work: Warren Buffett on Practically Everything, 1966-2012."

Buffett spoke of optimism for the future of the U.S. at the Forbes centennial party, according to a report of his remarks. The party, held at an event space overlooking the Hudson River, counted among its prominent attendees Steve Forbes, Sean P. Diddy Combs, Jack Welch, Sandy Weill, Steve Wynn, Eli Broad, Nicky Hilton and Steve Case.

While at the party, Buffett told a reporter for The Wall Street Journal that Berkshire's car insurance operation, Geico, would take a bigger hit from Hurricane Harvey than from Hurricane Irma. Last month, he said Geico could report losses from Harvey on about 50,000 cars. Harvey caused massive flooding in southeastern Texas, a state where Geico is the second-largest car insurer.

Hamdi Ulukaya, Sean Combs, Warren Buffett, Craig Venter, Ray Dalio, and Sandy Weill attend the Forbes Media Centennial Celebration at Pier 60 on September 19, 2017 in New York City.
Taylor HIll | FilmMagic | Getty Images
Hamdi Ulukaya, Sean Combs, Warren Buffett, Craig Venter, Ray Dalio, and Sandy Weill attend the Forbes Media Centennial Celebration at Pier 60 on September 19, 2017 in New York City.