Five years on: A look back at the destruction caused by Superstorm Sandy

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Natural Disasters

Five years on: A look back at the destruction caused by Superstorm Sandy

Streets damaged in Ortley Beach, New Jersey.
Tim Larsen | Governor's Office | Reuters

It has been five years since Superstorm Sandy slammed the Northeast Coast of the U.S., causing catastrophic destruction along the Jersey Shore; Long Island, New York; and New York City.

Sandy claimed the lives of at least 117 people in the U.S., according to the Red Cross. The storm surge caused major flooding along the coast — destroying housing and infrastructure — and left 7.5 million without power, causing over $62 million in damage.

While much of the infrastructure and homes have since been rebuilt and refortified, many with the help of federal assistance, there are still remnants from the devastating impact from this storm. For example, the L line between Brooklyn and Manhattan is planning to close for two years for repairs, much of which was caused by the hurricane.

As other regions in the U.S. and Caribbean continue to reel from the effects of hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, we take a look back five years ago on the impact of Superstorm Sandy.

  • A US flag waves in Breezy Point, Queens, in New York City

    A resident who lost her home takes pictures while walking through Breezy Point in Queens, New York.

    A resident who lost her home takes pictures while walking through Breezy Point.
    Adrees Latif | Reuters
  • Hurricane Sandy was a Superstorm

    In this handout GOES satellite image provided by NASA, Hurricane Sandy, pictured at 1440 UTC, churns off the east coast on Oct. 29, 2012, in the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy had already claimed over 50 lives in the Caribbean.

    In this handout GOES satellite image provided by NASA, Hurricane Sandy, pictured at 1440 UTC, churns off the east coast on October 29, 2012 in the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy, which has already claimed over 50 lives in the Caribbean is predicted to bring heavy winds and floodwaters to the mid-Atlantic region.
    NOAA | Getty Images
  • Star Jet roller coaster submerged in Seaside Heights, New Jersey

    Waves break in front of a destroyed amusement park wrecked by Superstorm Sandy on Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights. The Star Jet roller coaster remained in the water after the Casino Pier it sat on collapsed into the ocean from the force of the storm.

    Waves break in front of a destroyed amusement park wrecked by Hurricane Sandy on October 31, 2012 in Seaside Heights, New Jersey.
    Mario Tama | Getty Images
  • Mantoloking, New Jersey

    A satellite image shows a new inlet that was cut across the barrier island of the New Jersey coastal town Mantoloking, just north of where the storm made landfall in Ocean County, New Jersey. The new inlet connects the Atlantic Ocean and the Jones Tide Pond. The image on the right shows how the area has rebuilt and looks today.

    A satellite image view of Mantoling, N.J. after Hurricane Sandy hit (l) and how it looks in 2017.
    Reuters | Google Earth
  • Flooding in Lower Manhattan

    Residents stand over vehicles which were submerged in a parking structure in the financial district of Lower Manhattan.

    Residents stand over vehicles which were submerged in a parking structure in the financial district of Lower Manhattan.
    Adrees Latif | Reuters
  • Washed ashore

    Boats washed ashore by the storm piled next to a house near Monmouth Beach, New Jersey.

    Boats washed ashore piled next to a house near Monmouth Beach, New Jersey.
    Steve Nesius | Reuters
  • Neighborhood in flames

    Massive fires destroyed 110 homes in Breezy Point, one of the most devastating fires that occurred as a result of Superstorm Sandy.

    Massive fires destroyed 110 homes in Breezy Point, Brooklyn, one of the most devastating fires as a result of Hurricane Sandy.
    Todd Maisel | NY Daily News | Getty Images
  • Breezy Point then and now

    A satellite image of Breezy Point, showing the devastation from fires that reduced one neighborhood to ashes. The satellite image on the right shows how the Breezy Point looks today.

    Satellite images of Breezy Point, Queens after Hurricane Sandy hit in 2012 and what the area looks like in 2017.
    Getty Images | Google Earth
  • Breezy Point reduced to ashes 

    More than 50 homes destroyed in a fire during Superstorm Sandy are viewed Oct. 30, 2012, in the Breezy Point.

    Over 50 homes destroyed in a fire during Hurricane Sandy are viewed October 30, 2012 in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.
    Getty Images
  • Lower East Side of Manhattan then and now

    Submerged cars on Avenue C and 7th Street, after severe flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy, on Oct. 29, 2012, in Manhattan (l) and how the area looks in 2017.

    Then and now showing submerged cars on Ave. C and 7th st, after severe flooding caused by Hurricane Sandy, on October 29, 2012 in Manhattan (l) and how the area looks in 2017.
    Getty Images | Google Earth
  • Digging out

    Amy Neukom works to remove sand in her parents' home in the town of Mantoloking.

    Amy Neukom works to remove sand in her parents house in the town of Mantoloking, New Jersey.
    Lucas Jackson | Reuters
  • Taxis out of service 

    Taxis sit in a flooded lot in Hoboken, New Jersey, after Superstorm Sandy on Oct. 30, 2012.

    Taxis sit in a flooded lot after Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J.
    Getty Images
  • Manhattan in the dark

    The Flatiron Building stood dark after the storm left much of Manhattan below 42nd Street without power.

    The Flatiron Building is dark after Hurricane Sandy left much of Manhattan below 42nd street without power.
    Getty Images