US Treasury yields slip after JOLTS data

U.S. government debt yieldsslipped Monday after the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that the number of job openings was stagnant in the month of October.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.381 percent at 1:50 p.m. ET, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was down at 2.768 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

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US 3-MO
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US 1-YR
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US 2-YR
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US 5-YR
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US 10-YR
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US 30-YR
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The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the results of the October Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS). The number of job openings was "little changed" at 6 million on the last business day of October, while hires increased to 5.6 million, according to the Labor Department.

The Labor Department also said the number of job openings edged down for total private and was little changed for government, but remained at or near record high levels since June.

In the previous session, U.S. equities and bond markets were digesting the latest release of the U.S. jobs report. The nonfarm payrolls data for November revealed Friday that the U.S. had added 228,000 jobs last month, beating expectations of 200,000.

The unemployment rate remained steady, at 4.1 percent, while the wage data was below forecasts, with average hourly earnings rising 0.2 percent for the month.

In auction news, the Treasury Department auctioned $24 billion in 3-year notes at a high yield of 1.932 percent. The bid-to-cover ratio, an indicator of demand, was 3.15. Indirect bidders, which include major central banks, were awarded 59 percent. Direct bidders, which includes domestic money managers, bought 7.4 percent.

The Treasury Department also auction $20 billion in 10-year notes at a high yield of 2.384 percent. The bid-to-cover ratio, an indicator of demand, was 2.37. Indirect bidders, which include major central banks, were awarded 57.2 percent. Direct bidders, which includes domestic money managers, bought 8.4 percent.

While there are no major speeches set to take place by the U.S. Federal Reserve on Monday, investors will be waiting for the upcoming monetary policy meeting by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), to see if the central bank raises interest rates for the final time this year.

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In October, the Fed minutes revealed that a rate hike during this month was all but certain, in spite of the low inflation that weighs on market sentiment.

Politics will remain at the back of investors' minds, as markets keep a close eye on any developments coming out of the U.S. administration, whether that be related to Russia, overhauling the U.S. tax system or President Donald Trump's recent announcement that the U.S. would recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel — a move criticized internationally.