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The biggest offshore wind farm on the planet has chosen its turbine supplier

  • Hornsea Project Two is set to be completed in 2022.
  • It will produce enough electricity to power more than 1.3 million homes.
This image shows Orsted's Burbo Bank offshore facility, in Liverpool Bay.
Paul Ellis | AFP | Getty Images
This image shows Orsted's Burbo Bank offshore facility, in Liverpool Bay.

Danish renewable energy business Orsted has chosen Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE) to be the exclusive supplier of wind turbines for Hornsea Project Two.

The facility, which is due to be operational in 2022, will be the world's biggest offshore wind farm. It will use SGRE eight-megawatt turbines, Orsted said Wednesday.

Most of the turbine blades will be delivered from SGRE's facility in Hull, England. Additionally, SGRE is planning to partly source the wind turbine towers from the U.K.

Orsted's decision to choose SGRE as its turbine supplier for Hornsea Project Two continues the relationship between the two businesses.

"The SGRE factory in Hull has already been producing blades for our Race Bank and Walney Extension projects, and will produce the majority of blades for Hornsea Project One," Duncan Clark, programme director for Hornsea Project Two at Orsted, said in a statement.

"This selection paves the way for more, and even larger, U.K.-made blades at a U.K. offshore wind farm, underlining this country's world-leading position in the sector."



According to figures from trade body WindEurope, the U.K. installed 1.7 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind in 2017.

The scale of Hornsea Project Two is considerable. Located around 89 kilometers off the coast of Yorkshire in the North Sea, the facility will have a capacity of 1.4 GW and will generate enough electricity to power more than 1.3 million homes in the U.K.

The project will support more than 2,000 jobs during construction and as many as 130 permanent jobs during its operational life. Hornsea Project One, which is also under construction, will have a capacity of 1.2 GW.