American Greed

Disability attorney and convicted scammer, Eric C. Conn opens up about his crimes and his life in prison

In this Monday, Oct 7, 2013 file photo, attorney Eric Conn gestures as he i
Evan Vucci | AP
In this Monday, Oct 7, 2013 file photo, attorney Eric Conn gestures as he i

In one of the biggest Social Security frauds in American history, Eric Conn, who advertised himself as "Mr. Social Security," made millions by securing disability payments for his clients. However, when two social security administration employees turned whistleblowers uncovered over $500M in fraud, the "King of Disability Law" was finally brought down, leaving many of his clients cut off from their Social Security benefits.

Now, in a letter sent to "American Greed", Conn gives insight into his crime and time in prison.

Conn writes, "American Greed: My name is Eric C. Conn. I believe you and my lawyer Scott White have been in communication. The reason I am confined is because of my corruption with a federal judge involving $550M. This case has been labeled as the 'The biggest fraud in the history of the Social Security Administration.'" He goes on to state, "I believe on a strongly supported belief that we are about to enter what I call 'Phase II' in this ever-expanding case."

Page 1 of Eric Conn's letter to "American Greed" - written from prison.
Page 1 of Eric Conn's letter to "American Greed" - written from prison.

What is "Phase II"? Conn explains, "I always found it puzzling how anyone could think that I was able to 'accomplish' a fraud of this magnitude alone. Also, I am almost as puzzled that anyone could think I was able to flee across several international borders without the assistance of many of those same individuals. My lips are now free to 'tell all.' There is much more than anyone knows yet."

However, Conn doesn't elaborate in this letter to "American Greed" when it comes to that "tell all." Only leaving us with this final piece of advice, "I hope others can learn not to make the mistakes I did. I had it all and now I have nothing. People I thought were my friends now act as if I do not exist. I once had money to fly around the world and rent entire clubs, drive Rolls Royce's, and so much more. Now, I am sitting in a cell having to write letters on tissue paper. The irony (or poetic justice) of my situation does not escape me."

To learn more about this case and the crimes of Eric Conn, catch up on the latest episode of "American Greed." Then, make sure to tune in to CNBC Monday nights at 10P ET/PT for more all-new episodes.