Mark Zuckerberg said an independent 'Supreme Court' could fix Facebook's content problems

  • Facebook has faced controversy in recent months over data privacy, reports of Russian propaganda and misinformation related to ethnic cleansing in Myanmar.
  • The company has said it's building out its own security team, doubling the number of eyes reviewing content by the end of the year.
  • Zuckerberg suggested in an "Ezra Klein Show" podcast published Monday that those decisions might be better left to an independent body.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg thinks an independent body resembling a sort of "Supreme Court" could fix some of the social media site's content problems.

"Over the long term, what I'd really like to get to is an independent appeal. So maybe folks at Facebook make the first decision based on the community standards that are outlined, and then people can get a second opinion," he said.

"You can imagine some sort of structure, almost like a Supreme Court, that is made up of independent folks who don't work for Facebook, who ultimately make the final judgment call on what should be acceptable speech in a community that reflects the social norms and values of people all around the world," Zuckerberg said.

The company has faced controversy in recent months over data privacy, reports of the platform being used for Russian propaganda and misinformation related to ethnic cleansing in Myanmar.

Executives at the company have been repeatedly called on to outline what constitutes hate speech and destructive discourse on the site. But Zuckerberg suggested in an "Ezra Klein Show" podcast published Monday by Vox that those decisions might be better left to an independent body.

"I think in any kind of good-functioning democratic system, there needs to be a way to appeal. And I think we can build that internally as a first step," he said.

The company has said it's building out its own security team, doubling the number of eyes reviewing content by the end of the year.

"I think it's just a case where because we didn't invest enough, I think we will dig through this hole, but it will take a few years," Zuckerberg said. "I wish I could solve all these issues in three months or six months, but I just think the reality is that solving some of these questions is just going to take a longer period of time."