Trump confidant Roger Stone sought Clinton info from Wikileaks founder: Report

  • Roger Stone wanted Hillary Clinton-related emails from Wikileaks founder, Julian Assange, the Wall Street Journal reports.
  • Stone reportedly asked radio personality Randy Credico for "any State or HRC e-mail from August 10 to August 30--particularly on August 20, 2011."
  • Credico told the Journal that he "got tired" of Stone "bothering" him, and told Stone that had passed along the message to Assange.
Roger Stone speaks to the media at Trump Tower on December 6, 2016 in New York City.
Getty Images
Roger Stone speaks to the media at Trump Tower on December 6, 2016 in New York City.

Roger Stone, a longtime confidant and former campaign advisor to Donald Trump, sought information from Wikileaks founder Julian Assange about Hillary Clinton, according to emails viewed by the Wall Street Journal.

Stone reached out to Randy Credico, a radio personality who had interviewed Assange, in an email on Sept. 18, 2016 and asked him to contact the Wikileaks founder.

"Please ask Assange for any State or HRC e-mail from August 10 to August 30--particularly on August 20, 2011," Stone wrote, according to the Journal. He had no formal role with Mr. Trump's campaign at the time.

Stone wanted emails from Wikileaks about Clinton's alleged role in disrupting a supposed Libyan peace deal in 2011 when she was secretary of state, according to the Journal.

After a back-and-forth over email, Credico told the Journal that he "got tired" of Stone "bothering" him, and told Stone that he had passed along the message to Assange.

Both Stone and Credico told the newspaper they never had special access to Wikileaks' material.

Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat of the House Intelligence Committee, said that the emails between the two men had not been provided as part of the committee's probe of Russian election meddling, the Journal reported.

The omission, Schiff said, "would mean that his testimony was either deliberately incomplete or deliberately false."

Roger Stone told CNBC in an email that Schiff's statement was "typical bullshiff."

"The e-mails fall outside the scope of their request," Stone added. "My attorney will respond for the record."

Stone's lawyer, Grant Smith, told the Journal that the emails were "not encompassed within the scope of the committee's request." He did not immediately provide comment to CNBC.

Stone was interviewed by the House committee in September. Credico was subpoenaed by the committee in November to testify before the committee. He could not be reached for comment.

A representative for Rep. Devin Nunes, the Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, did not immediately respond to CNBC's request for comment on the report.

Read the full report on Stone's emails with Credico from the Wall Street Journal.