Twitter cracks down on right-wing media personality Alex Jones

  • Jones has been blocked from posting on Twitter for seven days, Dow Jones reported, citing the company.
  • The social media platform told CNBC that Jones' account now has "limited functionality," adding that Twitter required the deletion of a tweet that violated its rules.
Alex Jones from Infowars.com speaks during a rally in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump near the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016.
Lucas Jackson | Reuters
Alex Jones from Infowars.com speaks during a rally in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump near the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016.

Twitter has restricted the account of right-wing media personality Alex Jones for violating its policies, the company told CNBC.

Jones will be blocked from posting on Twitter for seven days because of a post that linked to a policy-violating video, Dow Jones reported.

A Twitter representative told CNBC: "I can confirm that a tweet was reported to us which contained a link to a video on Periscope. Upon review we determined it violated our rules and required the account to delete the tweet and video." Periscope is a live streaming app owned by Twitter.

Jones' Twitter account now has "limited functionality," a Twitter spokesperson told CNBC. During the seven day period, the account can't be used to tweet or retweet, but it can still be used to read others' posts.

Apple, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest and Spotify had earlier this month clamped down on content by Jones citing policy violations.

Apple removed podcasts of his infamous "The Alex Jones Show" as well as a number of other InfoWars audio streams on Aug. 6. Facebook and Google made similar decisions the same day.

Jones responded to last week's bans in a series of tweets and a live stream on Periscope. His accounts for both platforms remained up and active through that day.

Twitter told CNBC at that time that InfoWars and its associated accounts had yet to violate the guidelines for either platform.

— CNBC's Sally Shin and Ryan Browne contributed to this report.