New Yorker details 6 new allegations of sexual misconduct against CBS chief Les Moonves

  • A new report published by The New Yorker on Sunday reveals that six women have come forward with new allegations of sexual harassment or assault by CBS chairman and CEO Les Moonves.
  • The news comes as CBS and Moonves are reportedly in talks to negotiate terms under which Moonves will leave the company.
Leslie 'Les' Moonves, president and chief executive officer of CBS Corporation, attends the annual Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference, July 11, 2018 in Sun Valley, Idaho. 
Drew Angerer | Getty Images
Leslie 'Les' Moonves, president and chief executive officer of CBS Corporation, attends the annual Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference, July 11, 2018 in Sun Valley, Idaho. 

Six women have come forward with new allegations of sexual harassment by CBS chairman and CEO Les Moonves, the New Yorker reported on Sunday, just as sources tell CNBC that the company is in talks to sever ties with its longtime leader.

The new allegations were detailed in an article by investigative journalist Ronan Farrow published on Sunday by The New Yorker, who also penned an earlier story that implicated Moonves in several prior instances of misconduct.

The alleged incidents took place between the 1980s and early 2000s, according to the most recent report. The women accuse Moonves of exposing himself, forcing them to perform oral sex on him and using physical violence and intimidation against them.

In August, The New Yorker published its first article detailing Moonves' alleged misconduct. That report included the accusations of six other women.

The new allegations come as CBS and Moonves are said to be negotiating his exit package. CBS' board of directors is near completion of a settlement that would end its litigation with its controlling shareholder National Amusements — and sever ties with Moonves, according to people familiar with the situation.

In a statement released to CNBC, CBS said it took the allegations against Moonves "very seriously. Our Board of Directors is conducting a thorough investigation of these matters, which is ongoing."

The talks are described as fluid, but the parties hope to complete a settlement prior to the start of trading on Monday morning.

The New Yorker's full article can be found on its website.