Apple shares fall after Trump pressures iPhone maker to manufacture its products in U.S.

  • On Saturday President Donald Trump tweeted that Apple should manufacture its products in the U.S. to avoid his proposed tariffs on Chinese goods.
  • Bank of America Merrill Lynch said Apple may respond to the pressure from Trump by asking its partners to bring some iPhone assembly operations into the U.S. The move will lead to higher iPhone prices, according to the firm.

The good times for Apple shareholders may be over if President Donald Trump's trade war with China escalates and affects the company's products.

On Saturday, Trump tweeted that Apple should manufacture its products in the U.S. to avoid his proposed tariffs on Chinese goods.

"Apple prices may increase because of the massive Tariffs we may be imposing on China — but there is an easy solution where there would be ZERO tax, and indeed a tax incentive. Make your products in the United States instead of China. Start building new plants now. Exciting! #MAGA," he said on social media.

Tim Cook, Chief Executive Officer of Apple, speaks as President Donald Trump listens during an American Technology Council roundtable in the State Dinning Room of the White House, Monday, June 19, 2017, in Washington.
Alex Brandon | AP
Tim Cook, Chief Executive Officer of Apple, speaks as President Donald Trump listens during an American Technology Council roundtable in the State Dinning Room of the White House, Monday, June 19, 2017, in Washington.

The comment came a day after the company's letter to U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer was revealed, which said Trump's proposed tariffs on $200 billion worth of imported Chinese goods would affect the Apple Watch, AirPods, Mac mini and Apple Pencil.

As a result, analysts — including Bank of America Merrill Lynch's Wamsi Mohan and Loup Ventures' Gene Munster — analyzed the potential negative impact to Apple from Trump's proposed tariffs on China.

Apple shares fell 1.3 percent Monday after the reports.

Mohan also said the tech giant may respond to pressure from Trump by asking its partners to bring some iPhone assembly operations into the U.S., leading to higher iPhone prices.

"The conclusion was for the iPhone (not currently impacted by Tariffs) moving production (100% of final assembly) to the U.S. would need 20% price increases to offset the incremental labor costs," he said.

Apple shares are up 31 percent this year through Friday versus the S&P 500's 7 percent gain.

Last month Apple became the first publicly traded U.S. company to reach $1 trillion in market value.

The company did not respond to a request for comment.

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