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Michael Avenatti expects new accuser of Supreme Court pick Brett Kavanaugh to go public in next 36 hours, but only after 'adequate security measures'

Key Points
  • Trump nemesis Michael Avenatti says a third woman with damning allegations against Brett Kavanaugh will reveal her identity and detail her claims when "we have adequate security measures in place."
  • But the attorney also says in a tweet that he expects her to go public before Thursday's Senate Judiciary Committee hearing featuring scheduled testimony from the Supreme Court nominee and another accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.
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Trump nemesis Michael Avenatti said Tuesday a third woman with damning allegations against Brett Kavanaugh will reveal her identity and detail her claims when "we have adequate security measures in place."

But the attorney also said in a tweet Tuesday that he expects her to go public before Thursday's Senate Judiciary Committee hearing featuring testimony from Kavanaugh and another accuser, Christine Blasey Ford. Ford has claimed the Supreme Court nominee tried to sexually assault her when they were teenagers. Kavanaugh has denied all claims of sexual misconduct.

Ford's allegations date to the early 1980s, when she and Kavanaugh were high school students, the same time frame for the accusations by Avenatti's client.

"Let me be clear: We will disclose the client's name and accusations only when SHE is ready and we have adequate security measures in place," Avenatti's tweet said.

"And not a moment before that. It is her choice and hers alone as to when to surface bc it is her life. We expect it within the next 36 hrs."

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Avenatti, who in the past year has become a leading antagonist of President Donald Trump, said last month he was exploring running for the presidency in 2020.

Avenatti's client, whom he has called both an accuser and a witness against Kavanaugh, has not been publicly identified. NBC News has not be able to verify her allegations.

She would be the third woman, in addition to Ford and Kavanaugh's Yale University classmate Deborah Ramirez, to accused the now 53-year-old federal appellate judge of sexual misconduct as a young man.

Avenatti in an email to the Judiciary Committee's chief counsel for nominations outlined his client's allegations.

The email said he had knowledge of Washington-area house parties in the early 1980s, when Kavanaugh was in high school, at which Kavanaugh, his pal Mark Judge "and others would participate in the targeting of women with alcohol/drugs in order to allow a 'train' of men to subsequently gang rape them."

"There are multiple women that will corroborate these facts, and each of them must be called to testify," Avenatti said.

During an interview that aired Monday night on Fox News, Kavanaugh was asked "did you ever participate in any gang rape?"

Kavanaugh, his wife by his side, answered: "That's totally false and outrageous, never done such thing, known about such thing."

He then said that when he went to Georgetown Prep, an all-boys high school in Maryland, he was focused on "sports and academics, friendship with classmates and all girls school."

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"Yes, there were parties. Seniors had beer, it was legal," Kavanaugh said. "People generally have done things we look back on in high school ... but that's not what we're talking about."

"I've never sexually assaulted anyone."

Avenatti, in a tweet after that interview, said, "Brett Kavanaugh is a liar."

"His 'I was just an innocent boy' claims on Fox are laughable and an insult to any American with common sense," Avenatti said.

Referring to his client during an interview Monday night with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow, Avenatti said, "This woman when she does surface, will be found to be 100 percent credible by the American public."

"I would not be representing her if I did not believe her," Avenatti said.

The lawyer said his client does not have just "one specific allegation. It's a series of specific allegations, this is a pattern of behavior, Rachel, that took place across many months and many years."

"I believe that when these allegations are surfaced ... [there] will be no question that Brett Kavanaugh is not fit to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court."

Avenatti blasted Senate Republicans, who hold the majority on the Judiciary Committee, for not issuing a subpoena to Mark Judge, Kavanaugh's high-school friend. Judge, in addition to be the subject of accusations by Avenatti, also allegedly was in the same room with Kavanaugh in the early 1980s when Kavanaugh allegedly pinned Ford down on a bed, and held his hand over her mouth to keep her from crying out as he tried to undress her against her will.

Judge has said he has "no memory of this alleged incident" by Ford.

Avenatti also represents porn star Stormy Daniels, who on the eve of the 2016 presidential election received a $130,000 hush-money payment from President Donald Trump's personal lawyer in exchange for her silence about an affair she claims to have had with Trump a decade earlier.

Correction: This story was updated to correct that Avenattii's interview with Rachel Maddow was Monday night.

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