Tech's 'FAANG' stocks have lost more than $1 trillion and counting from highs amid tech rout

  • The five "FAANG" stocks have collectively lost more than $1 trillion in value from recent highs.
  • The FAANG stocks — Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google-parent Alphabet — all fell to begin Tuesday trading.

The five "FAANG" stocks collectively lost more than $1 trillion in market value from recent highs on an intraday basis Tuesday.

The stocks — Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google-parent Alphabet — all began Tuesday trading lower. Apple led the group's losses, falling 4.8 percent. The four other stocks later turned around, with Facebook and Alphabet ending the day higher.

Combined market capitalization losses since their 52-week highs hit $1.02 trillion on Tuesday:

  • Facebook: $253 billion
  • Amazon: $280 billion
  • Apple: $253 billion
  • Netflix: $67 billion
  • Alphabet: $164 billion

The five tech growth stocks, which were the favorite investments for the past decade, each closed in a bear market on Monday. Wall Street defines a bear market as a fall of 20 percent or more from a stock's 52-week high.

Goldman Sachs slashed its Apple price target on Tuesday. The firm said in a note there is a "weakness in demand for Apple's products in China and other emerging markets," as well as a disappointing reception for the iPhone XR model.

Facebook shares have slid 40 percent from their highs. A bevy of negative publicity has come since this summer, especially focused on top Facebook executives' handling of foreign influence on the 2016 U.S. election.

Amazon shares continue a fall begun when it gave a fourth-quarter outlook on Oct. 25 that was much lower than expected. Netflix and Alphabet shares, meanwhile, have largely fallen in lockstep with the rest of the FAANG stocks.

Facebook and Alphabet each hit their 52-week highs in July, at $218.62 a share and $1291.44 a share, respectively. Netflix peaked in June at $423.21 a share. Amazon and Apple were the most recent to hit 52-week highs at $2,550.50 a share in September and $233.47 a share in October, respectively.

— With reporting by CNBC's Dominic Chu .