Nissan reportedly wants to keep former Chairman Ghosn and his family away from his safe in Brazil

  • The Financial Times says Nissan thinks a safe in the apartment contains evidence that Ghosn used funds from a Nissan subsidiary called Zi-A Capital to buy the residence.
  • Nissan told the FT it feared that granting the Ghosn family access to the property could lead to the destruction of evidence.
Carlos Ghosn, chairman of the alliance between Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., pauses during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Paris Motor Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018.
Marlene Awaad | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Carlos Ghosn, chairman of the alliance between Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., pauses during a Bloomberg Television interview at the Paris Motor Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018.

Japanese carmaker Nissan wants to keep former Chairman Carlos Ghosn and his family from going back to their apartment in Copacabana for fear they would destroy evidence against him, The Financial Times reported.

The Times, citing a person with knowledge of the dispute, said Nissan thinks a safe in the apartment contains evidence that the Brazilian-born Ghosn used funds from a Nissan subsidiary called Zi-A Capital to buy the residence.

Nissan told the FT it feared that granting the Ghosn family access to the property could lead to the destruction of evidence. The statement came after a court in Brazil granted the Ghosns access to the apartment. Nissan said it would appeal that ruling to a higher court.

Ghosn was indicted in Tokyo on Monday for allegedly underreporting his compensation from Nissan in the company's financial statements over five years. Nissan was also indicted by Japanese prosecutors.

In a statement overnight, Nissan said: "Making false disclosures in annual securities reports greatly harms the integrity of Nissan's public disclosures in the securities markets, and the company expresses its deepest regret."

The FT said Ghosn's lawyer in Japan did not respond to its request for comment. Ghosn denies he intentionally understated his pay in financial documents, according to Japan broadcaster NHK.

Click here to read the full FT report.

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