Top Stories
Top Stories
Politics

Prosecutors to drop case against ex-Rep. Aaron Schock

Key Points
  • Former Rep. Aaron Schock of Illinois has agreed to repay tens of thousands of dollars in taxes and to campaign committees in exchange for prosecutors dismissing his felony corruption case.
  • Schock resigned from Congress in 2015 amid scrutiny of his spending, including redecorating his office in the style of the "Downton Abbey" TV series.
  • The 37-year-old was once a rising star of the Republican Party.
Former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock appears Wednesday, March 6, 2019 before his hearing at the U.S. Dirksen Courthouse in Chicago, Ill.
Antonio Perez | Chicago Tribune | Tribune News Service | Getty Images

Former Rep. Aaron Schock of Illinois has agreed to repay tens of thousands of dollars in taxes and to campaign committees in exchange for prosecutors dismissing his felony corruption case.

Schock appeared Wednesday morning in Chicago federal court where he agreed to repay his three campaign committees nearly $68,000. He must work with the Internal Revenue Service to determine how much he owes in taxes. If he holds up his part of the deal, prosecutors will drop the original felony counts that were filed against him within six months.

Schock resigned from Congress in 2015 amid scrutiny of his spending, including redecorating his office in the style of the "Downton Abbey" TV series. He was indicted in 2016 on 22 counts, including wire fraud and falsification of election commission filings.

Schock told reporters after Wednesday's court hearing that "there was never an attempt by me or my staff to commit crimes."

The 37-year-old was once a rising star of the Republican Party.

His attorneys argued the case should be dismissed, saying his prosecution violated separation-of-powers clauses. The Supreme Court declined last month to consider it.

The case was originally filed in central Illinois. The Justice Department transferred it to prosecutors in Chicago last year.

Next Article
Politics

Michael Bloomberg will not run for president in 2020

Key Points
  • Michael Bloomberg will not run for president in 2020, the billionaire businessman wrote in a statement posted online on Tuesday.
  • "I am clear-eyed about the difficulty of winning the Democratic nomination in such a crowded field," he wrote.
  • Though Bloomberg will not run for president, he wrote he would expand his environmental philanthropy, and announced the launch of a new project, Beyond Carbon, that he described as a "grassroots effort to begin moving America as quickly as possible away from oil and gas and toward a 100 percent clean energy economy."