Cramer: Why Monday's rally won't be the market's only good session

Key Points
  • Sentiment got too negative last week and the market can "roar across the board" when there are no natural sellers, CNBC's Jim Cramer says.
  • "If I'm right that the sellers have exhausted themselves, then today won't be the last good session we have, especially with the wave of positive analyst notes that I'm expecting this week," the "Mad Money" host says.
  • "Rallies based on a sentiment switch are often arbiters of some amazing moves the best moves," he says.
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Monday's rally won't be the market's only good session: Cramer

Wall Street could be in line for a string of good trading days as sentiment shifts and analysts get more bullish about stocks, CNBC's Jim Cramer said Monday.

The major indexes caught a spark during the session with the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbing more than 200 points, the Nasdaq adding almost 150 points, and the growing about 1.5 percent.

Cramer said he expected the market to increase because of the way stocks fell and rebounded on Friday.

"Last week, sentiment just got too negative, and when everybody's negative that means there's hardly anyone left to sell," the "Mad Money" host said. "With no natural sellers, the market can roar across the board."

"If I'm right that the sellers have exhausted themselves, then today won't be the last good session we have, especially with the wave of positive analyst notes that I'm expecting this week," he added.

Three tech stocks catapulted the market to start the week, Cramer said. He noted that analysts have turned bullish on names like Apple and Facebook. Additionally, Nvidia's $6.9 billion bid for Israeli chipmaker Mellanox could yield more upgrades, he said.

Bank of America made an upgrade on Apple and revealed 10 reasons why its bullish about the iPhone maker. The bank liked that Apple flipped its gross profit from negative in the first half of 2018 to positive in the second half, its loyal user base, and the potential for an acquisition. Apple added 3.5 percent to its stock before the market closed, which helped offset Boeing's losses on the Dow in the wake of the tragic Ethiopian Airlines crash.

"The only thing new here is the possibility of a re-acceleration in Apple's service revenues, but it's still—I found it fatuous—because it was about the Chinese no longer cracking down hard on gaming," Cramer said. "I call that thin gruel, people. Don't get me wrong, I agree with the upgrade—I still think you own Apple and you don't trade it—but there was nothing revelatory here."

Cramer also pointed out that Facebook got a hold-to-buy upgrade from Nomura Instinet. But as in Apple's case, the host said there's nothing much new in the assessment on the social media giant. Facebook has been shaking off negative headlines and CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced his plans for a "privacy-focused" future on Friday.

The stock gained almost 1.5 percent on Monday.

"Nomura recognizes that most people use Instagram to tell stories to everyone," Cramer said. "Despite all of the negative press, Facebook hasn't lost users, it's gained them, and … it's become almost a really cheap stock, especially now that the company's planning to slash costs over time."

Nvidia's play for Mellanox gave a boost to the chipmaker's artificial intelligence and data businesses, Cramer said. If the acquisition goes through, he said it could give the company an advantage over Intel.

"The deal may be defensive versus Intel, but it allows Nvidia to play offense," he said. "It's been on defense for so long, which is why I predict a slew of upgrades on the heels of this takeover."

"Rallies based on a sentiment switch are often arbiters of some amazing moves, the best moves ... With Nvidia's stock rallying more than target Mellanox, with the negatives for Facebook pretty well spelled out, and with Apple rallying on something that's been true for years," investors should be upgrading as well, Cramer said.

WATCH: Cramer explains why there could be more upside for the market

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Cramer: Why Monday's rally won't be the market's only good session

Disclosure: Cramer's charitable trust owns shares of Apple and Facebook.

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