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Here is all the firepower the Pentagon is asking for in its $718 billion budget

Key Points
  • The Defense Department is asking Congress for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, an increase of $33 billion or about 5% over what Congress enacted for fiscal 2019.
  • The Navy and Marine Corps request $205.6 billion, up $9.9 billion from fiscal 2019; the Air Force calls for $204.8 billion, up $11.8 billion from the last request, and the Army asks for $191.4 billion, up $12.5 billion from fiscal 2019.
Soldiers shoot a round down range from their M777A2 howitzer on Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, Aug. 22, 2014.
U.S. Army photo

WASHINGTON — When lawmakers return to Capitol Hill next week, they will begin considering the Pentagon's colossal budget request. The Defense Department is asking Congress for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, an increase of $33 billion or about 5% over what Congress enacted for fiscal 2019.

The budget is composed of a $544.5 billion base budget, $9.2 billion for emergency border funding and $164 billion for overseas contingency operations funding, aka the war budget.

The Navy and Marine Corps request $205.6 billion, up $9.9 billion from fiscal 2019; the Air Force calls for $204.8 billion, up $11.8 billion from the last request, and the Army asks for $191.4 billion, up $12.5 billion from fiscal 2019.

Congress has until Oct. 1 to approve the budget or negotiate a new funding deal with the White House.

Aircraft
Distinguished visitors observe operations on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Beard | US Navy

The Pentagon is asking for $57.7 billion to invest in the military's air domain. Of that total, the Defense Department wants $11.2 billion to buy 78 F-35 jets. The F-35 is Lockheed Martin's largest program and the world's most expensive weapons system.

Other major investments:

  • 78 F-35 fighters: $11.2 billion
  • 1 B-21 long-range strike bomber: $3 billion
  • 12 KC-46 tankers: $2.3 billion
  • 24 F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet fighters: $2 billion
  • 48 AH-64E attack helicopters: $1 billion
  • 6 P-8A Poseidon surveillance and anti-submarine planes: $1.5 billion
  • 8 F-15EX fighters: $1.1 billion
Ships
The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Pinckney and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ships conduct tactical maneuvers during GUAMEX 2014 in waters near Guam.
US Navy

The Pentagon wants $34.7 billion, the largest request in more than 20 years for shipbuilding, to grow and modernize the Navy's fleet. The Pentagon is also asking for long-range anti-ship missiles and a pair of unmanned surface vehicles to diversify the Navy's capabilities.

Other major investments:

  • 1 CVN-78 Ford-class aircraft carrier: $2.6 billion
  • 3 Virginia-class submarines: $10.2 billion
  • 3 DDG-51 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers: $5.8 billion
  • 1 frigate: $1.3 billion
  • 2 unmanned surface vehicles: $447 million
Vehicles
Marines bombard through a live fire range using M1A1 Abrams tanks in Djibouti, Africa during a training exercise.
US Marine Corps

The Pentagon is requesting $14.6 billion for ground combat systems. The request includes 6,402 combat and tactical vehicles with a price tag of $7.2 billion.

Other major investments:

  • 4,090 joint light tactical vehicles: $1.6 billion
  • 165 M-1 Abrams tank modifications: $2.2 billion
  • 56 amphibious combat vehicles: $0.4 billion
  • 131 armored multi-purpose vehicles: $0.6 billion
Space
The 45th Space Wing successfully launches a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket for the U.S. Navy lifted off from Space Launch Complex-41 July 9, 2013, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.
Pat Corkery | via U.S. Air Force

The Pentagon is requesting $14.1 billion to invest in the emerging security environment in outer space. Of that, it wants $72.4 million for a new Space Force headquarters, ahead of the establishment of a sixth and separate military branch proposed last year by Trump.

Other major investments:

  • New U.S. Space Force headquarters: $72.4 million
  • Continued investment in space launch capacity: $1.7 billion
  • Improved space-based missile warning capabilities: $1.6 billion