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Austria chancellor calls for snap election after far-right ally resigns over Russia influence scandal

Key Points
  • Heinz-Christian Strache said earlier Saturday he was stepping down from his posts as vice-chancellor and Freedom Party chief over the scandal, but he denied breaking any laws.
  • The Freedom Party, one of a number of anti-immigrant nationalist parties to have scored electoral success in Europe in recent years, has been the junior partner in Kurz's coalition for 18 months.
  • Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said he would propose to President Alexander Van der Bellen that a snap election be held as soon as possible.
Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Kurz and Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache attend a news conference in Vienna, Austria April 30, 2019.
Leonhard Foeger | Reuters

Conservative Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz pulled the plug Saturday on his coalition with the far-right Freedom Party, after the party's leader quit as vice chancellor over video showing him discussing state contracts in return for favors from a woman posing as a Russian oligarch's niece.

"Enough is enough," Kurz said in a statement to the media, listing several lesser scandals involving the Freedom Party that did not cause their coalition to collapse. He said he would propose to Austrian President Alexander Van der Bellen that a snap election be held as soon as possible.

The Freedom Party, one of a number of anti-immigrant nationalist parties to have scored electoral success in Europe in recent years, has been the junior partner in Kurz's coalition for 18 months.

Heinz-Christian Strache said earlier Saturday he was stepping down from his posts as vice-chancellor and Freedom Party chief over the video, but he denied breaking any laws.

The video, released a week before European parliament elections in which nationalist groups allied to Strache's party are expected to perform well across the continent, showed Strache meeting the woman in 2017, shortly before the election that brought him into government.

Strache, whose party has a cooperation agreement with Russia's ruling United Russia party, described the sting as a "targeted political assassination" and said it never led to any money changing hands. He insisted the only crime that took place was illegally videotaping a private dinner party.

In the footage, he appears to offer to funnel contracts towards a company in exchange for political and financial support. He discussed rules on party financing and how to work around them, although he also insisted on having to act legally.

"It was dumb, it was irresponsible and it was a mistake," Strache told a news conference, fighting back tears as he asked his wife and others to forgive him.

"In the cold light of day, my remarks were catastrophic and exceedingly embarrassing," he said. In an at-times rambling defense of his behavior, Strache also apologized for flirting with the woman, whom he describes as attractive in the recording.

"It was typical alcohol-fueled macho behavior in which, yes, I also wanted to impress the attractive female host and I behaved like a bragging teenager," he said.