Tech

GoDaddy shares surge on its biggest-ever buyback plan

Key Points
  • GoDaddy on Wednesday announced its biggest ever share buyback of $500 million.
  • The company reported a 12% rise in quarterly revenue as the web hosting company earned more per user, sending its shares up 10% in extended trading.
  • Average revenue per user rose 7.1% to $155 in the third quarter.
  • At the end of the quarter, GoDaddy had 19.1 million customers, up 4.6% from a year earlier.
The GoDaddy banner hangs outside of the New York Stock Exchange as the website hosting service makes its initial public offering on April 1, 2015 in New York City.
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GoDaddy on Wednesday announced its biggest-ever share buyback of $500 million and reported a 12% rise in quarterly revenue as the web hosting company earned more per user, sending its shares up 10% in extended trading.

The company, which manages about a fifth of all global web domains, has been helping its customers market and grow their businesses through inbuilt tools to expand their reach on social media platforms.

Average revenue per user rose 7.1% to $155 in the third quarter.

At the end of the quarter, GoDaddy had 19.1 million customers, up 4.6% from a year earlier.

The Scottsdale, Arizona-based company also tightened its full-year revenue forecast to a range of $2.98 billion to $2.99 billion, from the $2.97 billion to $3.0 billion expected earlier.

Net income attributable to the company rose to $76.2 million, or 42 cents per class A share, in the quarter ended Sept. 30, from $13.2 million, or 8 cents per share, a year earlier.

Total revenue rose 12% to $760.5 million.

Read the complete earnings release here.

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  • Baidu has been trying to cut its dependence on its core search business, which accounts for three-quarters of the company's revenue.
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