Markets

Stanley Druckenmiller is still bullish the market because of the Fed and Trump

Key Points
  • "I revealed a very bullish posture intermediate term since October when Powell guaranteed he would not rescind the insurance cuts," Druckenmiller told CNBC.
  • "The Fed is still whining about inflation being below target," he added. "So I am still 'riding the horse," echoing comments from fellow billionaire investor David Tepper to CNBC.
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Stanley Druckenmiller bullish on stock market in 'intermediate term'

Hedge fund manager Stanley Druckenmiller said Friday he agrees with fellow billionaire investor David Tepper's optimism on the market and said he, too, is still "riding the horse."

"I revealed a very bullish posture intermediate term since October when [Fed Chairman Jerome] Powell guaranteed he would not rescind the insurance cuts," Druckenmiller said in an email to CNBC's Joe Kernen. "Since then, both have worked out and the Fed is still whining about inflation being below target."

"In addition, Trump's election prospects have increased with two trade agreements and big win in Iran which the Democrats have responded poorly to," he added. "So I am still 'riding the horse' and bullish immediate term," echoing a phrase used by Tepper in an earlier email to Kernan.

Druckenmiller's comments come as U.S. equities prolong the longest bull market in U.S. history that began in March 2009. The S&P 500 has skyrocketed more than 380% since then and on Thursday reached an all-time high north of 3,300.

The investor said as recently as December he was frustrated he didn't take more risk in 2019 and was therefore unable to fully capitalize on the stock market's red-hot rally. The Duquesne Family Office, which Druckenmiller oversees, only broke into double-digit returns for the year in the final weeks of 2019, well behind the S&P's 29% rally for the year.

He blamed the lackluster returns on his conservative bet in June, when he loaded up on U.S. Treasurys after President Donald Trump sent a tweet in May that inflamed U.S.-China trade tensions. Before that, he said, he had been "93% invested in the market."

In the early 1990s, at the helm of the Soros Fund Management, Druckenmiller orchestrated a series of trades that capitalized off the British pound sinking and yielded a profit of about $1 billion. His performance while running Duquense Capital, his now-shuttered hedge fund, clocked in with an average of 30% annually to investors.