Health and Science

Air purifier that kills 99.9% of the coronavirus sees surge in global demand

Key Points
  • Hong Kong-based Aurabeat has created an air purifier that can eliminate over 99.9% of Covid-19.
  • CEO Phil Yuen says the company has seen a significant surge in global demand since launching the air filtration device.
  • Yuen believes the device can complement coronavirus precautions like mask-wearing and social distancing.
  • The air purifier could provide additional protection in residential spaces where people are less likely to wear masks.
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Air purifier that kills 99.9% of coronavirus sees huge order increase

Hong Kong-based Aurabeat has created an air purifier that can eliminate over 99.9% of Covid-19. CEO Phil Yuen says the company has seen a significant surge in global demand since launching the air filtration device.

Aurabeat's AG+ Silver Ion Plasma Sterilization Air Purifier cleans the air up to 3.4 times in one hour while actively eliminating bacteria and viruses. Yuen says Aurabeat developed the technology late last year. 

"We've seen a significant increase in orders and distribution requests coming from universities, hospitals, government agencies all looking to provide the same level of protection we're able to do here in Hong Kong," Yuen told CNBC's "Street Signs Asia."

Yuen told CNBC MRIGlobal, a U.S. research laboratory, verified the air purifier's ability to eliminate more than 99.9% of Covid-19 in 30 minutes, though the company acknowledges the machine's filter falls 0.3% shy of the gold-standard HEPA filters. The FDA has cleared Aurabeat to market the device in the U.S. as a medical grade air purifier under their modified enforcement policy for Covid-19.

Yuen says the air filtration device can complement indoor coronavirus precautions like mask-wearing and social distancing, or offer additional protection in residential spaces where people are less likely to wear masks.

Experts have debated the significance of airborne transmission in coronavirus spread. However, a study published in August found live traces of the virus can be found in aerosols. 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says that air cleaning alone cannot sufficiently protect individuals from coronavirus exposure. "When used along with other best practices recommended by CDC and others, filtration can be part of a plan to protect people indoors," the EPA advises.