Politics

White House southern border coordinator Roberta Jacobson to leave post end of April

Key Points
  • President Joe Biden's coordinator for the southern border Roberta Jacobson will leave her post at the end of April, the White House announced Friday.
  • White House National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan said Jacobson's departure is "consistent with her commitment at the outset to serve in the administration's first 100 days."
  • Jacobson's departure comes as the Biden administration works to address an increase in migrants apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border, including a record number of unaccompanied children crossing the border in March.
Special Assistant to the President and Coordinator for the Southern Border, Ambassador Roberta Jacobson, speaks during a press briefing on March 10, 2021, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC.
Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images

President Joe Biden's coordinator for the southern Border Roberta Jacobson will leave her post at the end of April, the White House announced Friday.

"Consistent with her commitment at the outset to serve in the administration's first 100 days, Ambassador Jacobson will retire from her role as coordinator at the end of this month," White House National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan said in a statement.

Jacobson's departure comes as the Biden administration works to address an increase in migrants apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border, including a record number of unaccompanied children crossing the border in March — more than 60% higher than the previous record in 2019.

Many migrants are coming from Central America, where natural disasters, food insecurity and violence are among many complex reasons pushing them to seek refuge in the U.S.

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Biden appointed Vice President Kamala Harris to lead diplomatic efforts with Mexico and the Central American nations of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador on March 24.

"They continue to drive toward the architecture that the president has laid out: an immigration system that is humane, orderly and safe," Jacobson, a former ambassador to Mexico, told The New York Times, which first reported her planned departure. "I leave optimistically. The policy direction is so clearly right for our country."

Jacobson traveled to Mexico in March to meet with government officials regarding migration and has represented the White House in press briefings.