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Satellite images show Russian warplanes destroyed in Crimea; Latvia names Russia a terrorism sponsor

This has been CNBC's live blog tracking developments on the war in Ukraine. Follow the latest updates here.

Explosions at Russian air base in Crimea destroy 9 warplanes
VIDEO3:4203:42
Explosions at Russian air base in Crimea destroy 9 warplanes

Russia continues its offensive in Ukraine's south and east, while Ukrainian counter-measures far behind enemy lines gain traction. Most notable is its suspected attack on Russian warplanes earlier this week at an airbase in Crimea.

Satellite images reveal at least eight Russian planes damaged or destroyed by explosions that hit the base on Tuesday, contrary to Moscow's denials that any aircraft was harmed.

Concerns continue to mount over the safety of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine. Meanwhile, Britain's Ministry of Defense says Russia's arms export industry is under strain.

Chairman Milley and Sullivan discuss additional weapons packages with Ukrainian counterparts

US Army General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, holds a press briefing about the US military drawdown in Afghanistan, at the Pentagon in Washington, DC September 1, 2021.
Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images

National security advisor Jake Sullivan and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley spoke with their Ukrainian counterparts, according to a Pentagon readout of the call.

"They discussed the unprovoked and ongoing Russian aggression in Ukraine and international support for the Ukrainian armed forces. Sullivan and Milley reaffirmed the steadfast support of the United States for Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity," the readout said of the call with Andriy Yermak of Zelenskyy's office and Commander-in-Chief of the Ukrainian Armed Forces Gen. Valery Zaluzhny.

The leaders also discussed additional arms packages.

— Amanda Macias

U.N. chief urges demilitarized zone around Zaporizhzhia amid Russian attacks

Secretary-General Antonio Guterres conducts a press briefing on the launch of the 3rd brief by the GCRG (Global Crisis Response Group) on Food, Energy and Finance at UN Headquarters.
Lev Radin | Lightrocket | Getty Images

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for all military activity around Zaporizhzhia nuclear power complex to end.

"Regrettably, instead of de-escalation, over the past several days there have been reports of further deeply worrying incidents that could, if they continue, lead to disaster," Guterres said in a statement.

"We must be clear that any potential damage to Zaporizhzhia or any other nuclear facilities in Ukraine, or anywhere else, could lead to catastrophic consequences not only for the immediate vicinity, but for the region and beyond. This is wholly unacceptable," he added.

Guterres also urged Moscow and Kyiv to agree on a path that would grant the IAEA, a nuclear watchdog agency, access to the site.

— Amanda Macias

Russian reporter put under house arrest over war criticism

Marina Ovsyannikova, a journalist who became known after protesting against the Russian military action in Ukraine during a prime-time news broadcast on state television, arrives for her court session over charges of "discrediting" the Russian army fighting in Ukraine, in Moscow on August 8, 2022.
Alexander Nemenov | AFP | Getty Images

A court in Russia ordered a former state TV journalist placed under house arrest for nearly two months pending an investigation and potential trial on charges of spreading false information about Russia's armed forces.

Marina Ovsyannikova was charged over a street protest last month, when she held up a banner that said, "Putin is a killer, his soldiers are fascists. 352 children have been killed (in Ukraine). How many more children should die for you to stop?"

If convicted, Ovsyannikova faces up to 10 years in prison under a new law that penalizes statements against the military. The law was enacted shortly after Russian troops moved into Ukraine.

In the courtroom on Thursday, Ovsyannikova held up a poster saying "Let the murdered children come to you in your dreams at night." She first made international headlines on March 14, when she staged an on-air protest against Moscow's war in Ukraine.

In March, Ovsyannikova appeared behind the anchor of an evening Channel One news broadcast holding a poster that said "Stop the war, don't believe the propaganda, they are lying to you here." She quit her job at the channel, was charged with disparaging the Russian military and fined 30,000 rubles ($270 at the time).

— Associated Press

Zelenskyy calls Russian shelling at nuclear power plant "one of the biggest crimes of the terrorist state"

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy attends a working session of G7 leaders via video link, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Kyiv, Ukraine June 27, 2022.
Ukrainian Presidential Press Service | via Reuters

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy called the Russian shelling near Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant "one of the biggest crimes of the terrorist state."

"Russian shells were recorded on the territory of the station in the immediate vicinity of the nuclear power plant facilities. Russia once again hit the bottom in the world history of terrorism. No one else has so obviously used a nuclear plant to threaten the whole world and to put forward some conditions," Zelenskyy said in an evening address on the Telegram messaging app.

Zelenskyy said that the fate of Zaporizhzhia is a global interest and called for Russia's immediate departure from the site and from Ukraine.

— Amanda Macias

U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine calls Russian shelling around Zaporizhzhia "height of irresponsibility"

U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Bridget Brink called Russian shelling around the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant "the height of irresponsibility."

In a tweet, Brink said that she shared that sentiment during a meeting with Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal.

In recent days, Zaporizhzhia, Europe's largest nuclear power plant has been beset with Russian strikes.

— Amanda Macias

Finland says it has registered a record number of Ukrainian refugees since Russia's invasion

Residents of the Donetsk Peoples Republic board a train at the Donetsk-2 railway station as they evacuate to Russias Rostov-on-Don Region. Amid the escalating conflict in east Ukraine, on February 18, 2022, the heads of the Lugansk and Donetsk People's Republics announced a mass evacuation of civilians to Russia.
Nikolai Trishin | Tass | Getty Images

The Finnish government says it has registered a record number of asylum seekers following Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

The Nordic country said that it has so far processed 33,480 applications for protection or about 95% of the applicants.

"One-third of those fleeing Ukraine are children," Finland's Immigration Service said in a statement, adding that the government is also preparing to enroll these children in Finnish schools.

— Amanda Macias

Nearly 4 million Ukrainians have registered for temporary status in European countries, UN says

People, mainly women and children, board a train at Przemysl station as they continue their onward journey from in war-torn Ukraine on March 23, 2022 in Przemysl, Poland.
Jeff J Mitchell | Getty Images

Nearly 4 million Ukrainians have registered as refugees seeking temporary protection status in European countries, the United Nations Refugee Agency estimates.

More than 10.6 million people have fled Ukraine's borders since Russia invaded Ukraine in late February, according to U.N. estimates. The majority of refugees have relocated to Poland, according to data collected by the agency.

"The escalation of conflict in Ukraine has caused civilian casualties and destruction of civilian infrastructure, forcing people to flee their homes seeking safety, protection and assistance. In the first five weeks, more than four million refugees from Ukraine crossed borders into neighbouring countries and many more have been forced to move inside the country," the agency wrote.

— Amanda Macias

12 unidentified civilians buried at a cemetery Bucha as death toll in Ukraine mounts

An Orthodox priest serves at the graves of unidentified civilians during their funeral at a local cemetary in the city of Bucha, Kyiv region, on August 11, 2022. 
Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

Editor's note: Graphic Content. Post shows images of body bags ahead of burial at a cemetery in Bucha, Ukraine.

The United Nations has confirmed 5,401 civilian deaths and 7,466 injuries in Ukraine since Russia's Feb. 24 invasion.

The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said the death toll in Ukraine is likely higher, because the armed conflict can delay fatality reports.

The international organization said most of the civilian casualties recorded were caused by the use of explosive weapons with a wide impact area.

Municipal workers remove body bags of some twelve unidentified civilians from the back of a morgue container to be laid in coffins ready for burial at a local cemetary in the city of Bucha, Kyiv region, on August 11, 2022. 
Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images
A coffin is carried as municipal workers remove body bags of some twelve unidentified civilians from the back of a morgue container to be laid in coffins ready for burial at a local cemetary in the city of Bucha, Kyiv region, on August 11, 2022.
Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images
Municipal workers remove body bags of some twelve unidentified civilians from the back of a morgue container to be laid in coffins ready for burial at a local cemetary in the city of Bucha, Kyiv region, on August 11, 2022. 
Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images

— Sergey Supinski | AFP | Getty Images

Celebrity chef Jose Andres brings World Central Kitchen to Ukraine

Celebrity chef Jose Andres met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in Kyiv after delivering more than 130 million meals to the war-torn country since Russia's invasion.

The two-star Michelin chef and restaurateur brought the World Central Kitchen, a humanitarian organization dedicated to feeding vulnerable communities, to Ukraine to address the food crisis triggered by Russia's war.

— Amanda Macias

Ukrainian nuclear company says Russian shelling at Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant continues

A serviceman with a Russian flag on his uniform stands guard near the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside the Russian-controlled city of Enerhodar in the Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine August 4, 2022.
Alexander Ermochenko | Reuters

Ukrainian nuclear company Energoatom says the situation at Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is getting worse and that Russian shelling continues at the site.

"The invaders once again targeted the territory of the nuclear power plant, the hit was recorded not far from the first power unit. They damaged the sewage pumping station. Extensive smoke was seen nearby," Energoatom wrote on the Telegram messaging app.

"The situation is getting worse," the company wrote, adding that "several radiation sensors have been damaged."

— Amanda Macias

Britain will send multiple launch rocket systems and guided missiles to Ukraine

MLRS "Grad" of the DPR army is working on the positions of Ukrainian army in the industrial zone of Avdiivka, in Yasynuvata, Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine on May 28, 2022. 
Leon Klein | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

British Defence Secretary Ben Wallace approved the delivery of additional multiple-launch rocket systems and missiles to Ukraine.

"This latest tranche of military support will enable the Armed Forces of Ukraine to continue to defend against Russian aggression and the indiscriminate use of long-range artillery," Wallace wrote in a statement.

"Our continued support sends a very clear message, Britain and the international community remain opposed to this illegal war and will stand shoulder-to-shoulder, providing defensive military aid to Ukraine to help them defend against Putin's invasion," he added.

Ukrainian troops were trained by British forces on how to use these weapons systems earlier this year.

— Amanda Macias

Satellite images reveal destroyed Russian warplanes in Crimea

Satellite images reveal Russian warplanes in Crimea destroyed in airstrike
VIDEO1:2201:22
Satellite images reveal Russian warplanes in Crimea destroyed in airstrike

Satellite images show the aftermath of a Ukrainian missile strike on a Russian air base in Crimea. The images reveal at least eight Russian planes damaged or destroyed.

The Kremlin denies any aircraft were lost, but does say 1 person was killed and 14 were injured.

— DeLon Thornton

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Kuleba slams Russian citizens who "overwhelming support the war"

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba slammed Russians for cheering "missile strikes on Ukrainian cities" and for their overall support of the Kremlin's war.

"This is Russia's, not just Putin's war. Not Putin, but actual Russian soldiers come from Russia to kill, torture and destroy. Russians overwhelmingly support the war, cheer missile strikes on Ukrainian cities and murder of Ukrainians," Kuleba wrote on Twitter.

"Let Russian tourists enjoy Russia then," he added.

A day prior, Kuleba called on the European Union and the G-7 countries to stop issuing visas to Russian citizens.

— Amanda Macias

McDonald's plans to reopen some restaurants in Ukraine

People are stand queue to McDonald's in central Kyiv, Ukraine, on 29 May, 2020.
STR | Nurphoto | Getty Images

McDonald's is planning a phased reopening of some of its restaurants in Ukraine, where the company noted other businesses are safely operating.

The fast-food company said in a message posted to its website that it will work over the next few months to get product back to the restaurants, bring back employees and physically prepare its locations in Kyiv and western Ukraine to start serving customers again.

McDonald's had announced in February that it would pause its operations in Ukraine after Russia's invasion of the country. Before that, McDonald's had 109 restaurants in Ukraine. The chain declined to comment on how many restaurants will be opening as part of its plan to resume operations in the country.

"We've spoken extensively to our employees who have expressed a strong desire to return to work and see our restaurants in Ukraine reopen, where it is safe and responsible to do so," Paul Pomroy, the corporate senior vice president of international operated markets, said in the message posted online. "In recent months, the belief that this would support a small but important sense of normalcy has grown stronger."

— Ian Krietzberg

IAEA chief will brief UN Security Council on Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant

Rafael Grossi, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, points on a map of the Ukrainian Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant as he informs the press about the situation of nuclear powerplants in Ukraine during a special press conference at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria on March 4, 2022.
Joe Klamar | AFP | Getty Images

The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Mariano Grossi, will brief the United Nations security council about the nuclear safety and security situation at Ukraine's Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant.

Grossi will also share plans with the international forum on efforts to lead an IAEA expert mission to the site as soon as possible.

Grossi is scheduled to address the U.N.'s security council at 3 p.m. ET.

His remarks come on the heels of Russian shelling at the nuclear power plant that has triggered widespread alarm about the potential risk of a severe nuclear accident.

— Amanda Macias

Zelenskyy calls for more weapons and ammunition 'to the maximum extent possible'

In this photo illustration, a screen showing president of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelenskyy's speech before the members of the international tribunal in The Hague. He accused the Russian authorities of war crimes and international terrorism.
Igor Golovniov | Lightrocket | Getty Images

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy urged Western allies to send Ukraine weapons and ammunition "to the maximum extent possible" during a virtual address before northern European allies gathered in Denmark.

Zelenskyy also requested governments to impose additional sanctions on Russia.

"It is the duty of our countries and all future generations of free people to do everything we can to stop Russia, to ensure that it loses this war, and to ensure that no other nation can repeat this terror," he added.

— Amanda Macias

Children with disabilities among Ukraine's most vulnerable, UN human rights experts say

A woman holds a child next to a destroyed bridge during an evacuation from Irpin, outside of Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 28, 2022.
Oleksandr Ratushniak | Reuters

UN human rights experts are raising concerns regarding children with disabilities in Ukraine caught in the crosshairs of the Kremlin's war.

"The current humanitarian crisis stemming from the Russian invasion last February has placed Ukraine in an existential crisis. Like all conflicts, it is having a disproportionate impact on persons with disabilities especially children with disabilities placed in institutions," UN experts wrote in a statement.

The experts said that in some cases children receiving care in specialized institutions have been displaced and in some cases completely separated from their families due to Russian attacks on educational and medical facilities.

"We strongly reiterate our many previous calls on the Russian Federation to immediately end its aggression against Ukraine," the experts said, and called on Ukraine to invest in this specific cause during reconstruction, pledging their assistance in that effort.

— Amanda Macias

Satellite imagery shows at least 8 Russian warplanes hit in Crimea attack

A satellite image provided by Planet Labs shows destroyed Russian aircraft at Saky airbase in Crimea after an explosion on Aug. 9th, 2022.
Courtesy: Planet Labs

Satellite imagery from U.S.-based Planet Labs shows at least eight Russian warplanes damaged or destroyed from massive explosions that took place on Tuesday at Russia's Saky airbase in Crimea.

The Kremlin has denied that any planes were damaged in the blasts that it says killed one person, injured 14 more and damaged nearby houses.

The Ukrainian air force says at least nine Russian planes were destroyed while on land, although Ukrainian officials have not publicly taken responsibility for what analysts say was likely an attack either directed by Kyiv or carried out by Ukrainian partisans.

Smoke rises after explosions were heard from the direction of a Russian military airbase near Novofedorivka, Crimea, on Aug. 9, 2022.
Stringer | Reuters

Russia has downplayed the possibility of a targeted attack, although analysts say the satellite imagery suggests just that. Moscow has said that "aviation munitions detonated" in a storage facility at the base.

— Natasha Turak

Britain, Denmark pledge more military and financial aid to Ukraine

Ukrainian serviceman holds a Next Generation Light Anti-armour Weapon (NLAW) on the position not far from the front line in the south of Kharkiv region, on July 11, 2022, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.
Anatolii Stepanov | Afp | Getty Images

Britain and Denmark will provide more military and financial aid to Ukraine in its defense against Russia's invasion, the countries' defense ministers said during a Ukraine Donor Conference in Copenhagen.

Denmark will up its financial aid to Ukraine by 110 million euros ($114 million), bringing its total financial aid for the embattled country since the war began to more than 3 billion Danish crowns, or $417 million.

"This is a war on the values that Europe and the free world are built upon... Today we reaffirm our commitment to support of Ukraine," Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said at the conference.

British Defence Secretary Ben Wallace and Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskiy shake hands after a meeting, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Kyiv, Ukraine June 10, 2022.
Ukrainian Presidential Press Service | Reuters

The U.K. has already supplied Ukraine with advanced weapons and training for its armed forces, and is the second-largest provider of military aid for the country after the U.S. Britain will donate more multiple-launch rocket systems to Ukraine as well as a "significant number" of precision-guided missiles capable of hitting targets up to 50 miles away, U.K. Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said.

"This latest tranche of military support will enable the armed forces of Ukraine to continue to defend against Russian aggression and the indiscriminate use of long-range artillery," Wallace said in a statement.

"Our continued support sends a very clear message, Britain and the international community remain opposed to this illegal war and will stand shoulder-to-shoulder, providing defensive military aid to Ukraine to help them defend against Putin's invasion," he said.

— Natasha Turak

Russia has doubled its air strikes from the previous week: Ukrainian military official

The number of Russian airstrikes on civilian and military infrastructure has doubled from the prior week, Oleksiy Hromov, Ukrainian brigadier general, said during a news conference. He added, however, that the accuracy of the strikes is low.

"The enemy's planes and helicopters avoid flying into the range of our air defenses, and therefore the accuracy of these strikes is low," he was quoted by Reuters as saying.

CNBC was not able to independently verify the information.

Local residents look at the damages after an early morning Russian forces' strike in Kostiantynivka, eastern Ukraine, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine.
Bulent Kilic | AFP | Getty Images

— Natasha Turak

UN secretary-general calls for immediate cease-fire around Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres demanded a halt to military activity in the vicinity of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine.

"I am calling on the military forces of the Russian Federation and Ukraine to immediately cease all military activities in the immediate vicinity of the plant and not to target its facilities or surroundings," Guterres said in a statement.

Russian forces have occupied the Zaporizhzhia plant — the largest nuclear power plant in Europe — since early March, and periods of shelling near the plant have led nuclear experts, including the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency, to warn of disastrous consequences.

The Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the Zaporizhzhia region of Ukraine August 4, 2022.
Alexander Ermochenko | Reuters

— Natasha Turak

Ukrainian toymaker turns weapons of war and patriotic symbols into soft toy line

Nataliia, a worker of the Kopytsia tory factory, holds the javelin toy after gluing it on August 10, 2022 in Nizhyn, Ukraine. 
Alexey Furman | Getty Images

Russia's nearly six-month-long assault on Ukraine has turned Bayraktar drones, javelin anti-tank missiles and the An-225 Mriia cargo plane into patriotic symbols for Ukrainians.

The Kopytsia family toy factory has now made them into a line of soft toys.

Seamstresses of the Kopytsia toy factory sew various toys on August 10, 2022 in Nizhyn, Ukraine. 
Alexey Furman | Getty Images
Nina, a worker of the Kopytsia tory factory, poses for a portrait with the Mriia airplane toy on August 10, 2022 in Nizhyn, Ukraine. 
Alexey Furman | Getty Images
A stinger toy is seen on the table in one of the rooms of the Kopytsia toy factory on August 10, 2022 in Nizhyn, Ukraine.
Alexey Furman | Getty Images
A toy of Patron the dog is seen on the table in one of the rooms of the Kopytsia toy factory on August 10, 2022 in Nizhyn, Ukraine. The nearly six-month-long assault on Ukraine by Russia has turned Bayraktar drones, javelin anti-tank missiles and the An-225 Mriia cargo plane into patriotic symbols for Ukrainians. 
Alexey Furman | Getty Images

— Alexey Furman | Getty Images

Russia succeeds when it 'manages to divide us,' Ukrainian defense minister says

Ukrainian Minister of Defence Oleksii Reznikov attends the Ukraine Security Consultative Group meeting at Ramstein air base on April 26, 2022 in Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany.
Thomas Lohnes | Getty Images

Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov thanked his British, Danish and American counterparts for their support while attending the Ukraine donor conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, during which he stressed the importance of staying unified against Russia.

"Russia's words, and agreements with them, are not worth the paper they are written on. So what can be done? This solution is obvious," Reznikov said. "Russia succeeds when it manages to divide us, when it confronts us one-on-one, pulling together its resources and beating us. Russia is defeated and backs down when it loses the initiative, and meets with coordinated resistance."

The conference was being held to discuss long-term financial and military support for Ukraine's defense in its war against Russia. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy also addressed the conference via video call.

— Natasha Turak

Ukraine says over 300 children killed and more than 6,000 deported since start of war

This photograph taken on July 15, 2022, shows recently made graves at a cemetery in the Vinogradnoe district, Donetsk region, amid the ongoing Russian military action in Ukraine.
- | Afp | Getty Images

The Ukrainian parliament's human rights commissioner published updated numbers for child casualties in the five and a half months since Russia's invasion began on Feb. 24.

According to the commissioner, 316 children have been killed and 705 injured. Additionally, 204 children are listed as missing and 6,159 have been deported, the commissioner said. Ukrainian prosecutors and Western officials are investigating what they say is the forced deportation of potentially hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians into Russia, which is considered a war crime.

Moscow denies any such accusations and says that Ukrainians have come into Russia of their own accord.

— Natasha Turak

Latvia's parliament names Russia as a state supporter of terrorism

The Laima Clock landmark in central Riga.
Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Latvia's parliament, the Saeima, designated Russia as a terrorist-supporting state and urged the EU to ban the entry of Russian citizens for tourism.

In a statement, the parliament said: "Russia has been providing support and financing for terrorist regimes and organizations for many years, directly and indirectly, as the largest arms supplier for the Assad regime in Syria and as an implementer, such as the poisoning of the Skripal family or the shooting of the MH-17 aircraft."

It added: "In Ukraine, Russia has chosen a similar, cruel, immoral, and illegal tactic, using imprecise and internationally banned weapons and ammunition, targeting disproportionate brutality against civilians and public places."

Latvia's public broadcaster LSM wrote that "the Saeima acknowledges Russia's violence against civilians, which is being pursued for political purposes, as terrorism and Russia as a country supporting terrorism, and calls on other similar-thinking countries to express such an opinion."

In response, Russia's Foreign Ministry condemned what it described as Latvia's "xenophobia" over the resolution, Reuters reported, citing ministry spokesperson Maria Zakharova.

— Natasha Turak

Russia's military exports now 'under significant strain,' UK says

Russia's arms industry is a major export sector for the country, but it's now likely to face problems in fulfilling some of its orders because of the strain on capacity from the war in Ukraine, Britain's Ministry of Defense wrote in its daily intelligence briefing on Twitter.

"Russia is highly unlikely to be capable of fulfilling some export orders for armoured fighting vehicles because of the exceptional demand for vehicles for Russia's own forces in Ukraine, and the increasing effect of Western sanctions," the ministry wrote.

Its "military industrial capacity is now under significant strain, and the credibility of many of its weapon systems has been undermined by their association with Russian forces' poor performance in the Ukraine war," the post added.

— Natasha Turak

Attacks on Europe’s largest nuclear power plant leave former worker 'very scared'

A Russian serviceman patrols the territory of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power station in Energodar on May 1, 2022. Europe's largest nuclear power station has become a fighting ground for the conflict, with both sides blaming each other for attacks on and around the complex.
Andrey Borodulin | Afp | Getty Images

As Ukraine and Russia trade blame for shelling around Europe's largest nuclear power plant, one former employee said the consequences could be catastrophic and that she is terrified for her former colleagues at the facility in the town of Enerhodar. 

"The mood there is very sad. It is very scary for them to work," Alyona, 37, told NBC News on Tuesday from the city of Zaporizhzhia, which is still under Ukrainian control. 

NBC News isn't revealing her last name because she still has family in parts of the Zaporizhzhia region under Russian rule and she fears repercussions. Also, her husband is in the Ukrainian army. 

Alyona said she stopped going to work as an engineer at the nuclear plant after Russian forces seized it in March and escaped to Zaporizhzhia soon after.

She added that she is still able to call and exchange messages with some of her former co-workers at the plant, which was operated by around 11,000 people before the Russian invasion. The number of staff currently working there is unknown. 

Read more of this NBC News report here.

Ukrainian FM Kuleba calls on Western countries to stop issuing visas to Russian citizens

Russian flag flies with the Spasskaya Tower of the Kremlin in the background in Moscow, Russia, February 27, 2019.
REUTERS | Maxim Shemetov | File Photo

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba called on the European Union and the G-7 countries to stop issuing visas to Russian citizens.

"Russians overwhelmingly support the war on Ukraine. They must be deprived of the right to cross international borders until they learn to respect them," Kuleba wrote on Twitter.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy told The Washington Post that the only way to stop Russia from annexing any more of Ukraine's territory is for Western countries to ban all Russian citizens.

— Amanda Macias

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